Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [XP] What is a 'bug'? (was: Moving Risky Items Forward)

Expand Messages
  • Dossy
    ... Keeping definition of terms fixed throughout this argument, you would could call it a bug. It depends on if it was more than just a bad idea, such a bad
    Message 1 of 44 , Nov 30, 2000
      On 2000.11.30, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
      > At 11:29 PM 11/30/2000 +0100, Laurent Bossavit wrote:
      > >Interesting. I also read a tautology in Ron's definition of "bug",
      > >but at another level, namely "bugs have negative business value".
      > >Conversely, all things that have negative business value are bugs.
      >
      > What about a correctly-implemented feature that turns out to be a bad idea?
      > If it's built to the customer's requirements I wouldn't call it a bug,
      > would you?

      Keeping definition of terms fixed throughout this argument, you
      would could call it a bug. It depends on if it was more than just
      a bad idea, such a bad idea that it actually contributes negative
      business value to the project. It would be a Customer-introduced bug,
      as opposed to a Developer-introduced bug. Still a bug, though. Still
      a bug that can be removed from the system by a story, a task, and
      tests then coding. Even if it means simply checking out a prior
      source tree from the SCC repository to "undo" the last code changes
      that were made to implement the bug.

      This all makes sense as long as you keep the terminology consistent.

      - Dossy

      --
      Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@...
      Panoptic Computer Network web: http://www.panoptic.com/
    • John Brewer
      ... which ... That s why I like the fault/failure distinction. It s always a fault, even if it never causes a failure. John Brewer Jera Design
      Message 44 of 44 , Dec 4, 2000
        --- In extremeprogramming@egroups.com, "David Vivash" <PMA98DAV@S...>
        wrote:
        >
        > This thread reminds me of the question "if you''ve got an error
        which
        > is never exposed by your program, is it a bug?"
        > That is, you could UT a method and get an unexpected result, but
        > this particular cicumstance never happens in your real code.

        That's why I like the fault/failure distinction. It's always a fault,
        even if it never causes a failure.

        John Brewer
        Jera Design
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.