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Re: [XP] User Stories, APIs and data feeds

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  • Ram Srinivasan
    It makes sense Ron, thanks very much. Training wheels format is not *the* template for user stories. Thanks, Ram ... [Non-text portions of this message have
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 9, 2013
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      It makes sense Ron, thanks very much. Training wheels format is not *the*
      template for user stories.

      Thanks,
      Ram


      On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 8:09 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Hi Ram,
      >
      >
      > On Jul 8, 2013, at 11:40 PM, Ram Srinivasan <vasan.ram@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Would it still make sense to write user stories (for API-app) in "As a
      > > <role> ..." format, where role is the ultimate end user of an api/feed
      > > (marshalled through an intermediate "system")? What would be the benefit?
      > > And drawback?
      >
      > A user story has three parts according to us guys what first used them:
      > the card, upon which something is typically written, the conversation,
      > which is what gets the programmers and the customer on the same page, and
      > the confirmation, which is a clear statement of the acceptance conditions
      > for the story, and is the basis for its automated acceptance tests.
      >
      > As such, it doesn't matter a bit what you write on the card, much less
      > what syntax you use. The card is there to remind everyone what they are
      > talking about. You could call the story Marie and it would work just as
      > well.
      >
      > The famous as-a format is training wheels. If it has value, it is in
      > helping people, when coming up with stories, to think about who wants the
      > feature and why.
      >
      > Now your question remains important, and a number of respondents have
      > brought this out. The temptation to say "as a computer, I want RAM in me,
      > so that I can remember stuff" is a sign that we do not understand the
      > business purpose of something, in your case an API.
      >
      > The story can be any phrasing we want but we need to become clear what
      > human user of the software wants it, and why. We often call that "business
      > purpose" or "business value".
      >
      > Once we understand the business value, we're on a good path. So long as we
      > do not, we're off the road entirely.
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > Sometimes I give myself admirable advice, but I am incapable of taking it.
      > -- Mary Wortley Montagu
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


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