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Re: [XP] Help with an article?

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  • Esther Schindler
    Wah! The article just went live today! Why your users hate Agile development (and what you can do about it) What developers see as iterative and flexible,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 4 3:26 PM
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      Wah! The article just went live today!

      Why your users hate Agile development (and what you can do about it)
      What developers see as iterative and flexible, users see as disorganized and never-ending. Here�s how some experienced developers have changed that perception.

      http://www.itworld.com/software/359398/why-your-users-hate-agile-development-and-what-you-can-do-about-it



      On Jun 4, 2013, at 3:24 PM, Francis Fish <francis@...> wrote:

      > Hi Esther
      >
      > Just found this half-answered in my drafts to thought I'd finish it :)
      >
      > >
      > > * How do you describe the Agile process to a client or user who is
      > > expecting something different?
      > >
      >
      > Different from what? If you mean waterfall then it's about delivering
      > working software incrementally, preferably the most risky/challenging
      > pieces first, without the last minute scrabble and overruns because people
      > have developed the habit of delivering useful stuff continuously. This also
      > means that it's easy to spot if things were under specified (or rather
      > under budgeted) early.
      >
      > > * What, in your experience, are their big concerns about doing things
      > > without a Big Design Up Front process? What about the little ones?
      > >
      >
      > BDUF is something *we* used to do. Users used to see it as a burden and it
      > was always rushed at the inception phase. However agile needs constant
      > feedback - and they don't like being asked for it when they're off doing
      > things they see as more important. This creates a continuous tension
      > instead of one that only lasts a few weeks. If they don't buy in, or employ
      > a BA who is also always looking at something 6 months hence, it's gonna get
      > really hard.
      >
      > Also lots of people misread the manifesto and don't do any design at all -
      > then end up making mud pies (as in the Big Ball of Mud pattern) and it all
      > has to be rewritten in 18 months time if the business hasn't failed.
      >
      > Users want *capability* not user stories, designs or any other of the
      > artefacts we use to deliver that capability. We need to lift our heads up
      > much more often :)
      >
      > >
      > > * What has gone wrong? What would you do differently, in those situations,
      > > knowing what you do now?
      > >
      >
      > Spend a lot more time making sure people are talking to each other about
      > what they need, or more importantly why it's needed. Make sure that we can
      > deliver the minimum they need within the external constraints.
      >
      > >
      > > * What do YOU think makes users and clients anxious? What do you do to
      > > counter it?
      > >
      >
      > They have budgets and need things done by a particular time. We, instead,
      > flex on functionality and backlog. This will cause conflict unless we make
      > sure that they get what they want when they want it. This needs contingency
      > building in, instead of being taken out. It also needs a culture of trust
      > and less politics.
      >
      > I have found that flexing on functionality means that you need to make sure
      > that you know what the business need in some detail, and you need to know
      > the *why* rather than the *what*. You can find a way to something that
      > gives capability with the *why* - the what is just an implementation
      > detail. I've found the idea of "commander's intent" really useful when
      > discussing this with people.
      >
      > Shameless plug - I talk about this at some length in Unicorns in the Mist
      > https://leanpub.com/unicorns :)
      >
      > >
      > > * Please DO NOT spend time telling me how great Agile is. I already know
      > > that. That's not what this article is about.
      > >
      > > I do all of this by e-mail, not telephone. I'll also be collecting input
      > > all week, with the fond hope that I will have enough to assemble into an
      > > article by next weekend.
      > >
      > > --Esther Schindler
      > > twitter.com/estherschindler
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      > Thanks and regards,
      >
      > Francis
      >
      > Follow me on twitter https://twitter.com/fjfish
      > Blog at http://www.francisfish.com
      > Books at https://leanpub.com/u/fjfish
      > CV http://www.pharmarketeer.com/francis.html
      >
      > I have no intention of apologizing for believing in people, for insisting
      > that we all use this moment and these assets to create some art and improve
      > the world around us.
      > To do anything less than that is a crime. - Seth Godin
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Francis Fish
      ... It s nice to see there is a lot of congruence, I m not going mad. :) [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 4 3:31 PM
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        On Tue, Jun 4, 2013 at 11:26 PM, Esther Schindler <esther@...>wrote:

        > Wah! The article just went live today!
        >
        > Why your users hate Agile development (and what you can do about it)
        > What developers see as iterative and flexible, users see as disorganized
        > and never-ending. Here�s how some experienced developers have changed that
        > perception.
        >
        >
        > http://www.itworld.com/software/359398/why-your-users-hate-agile-development-and-what-you-can-do-about-it
        >
        >
        >
        >
        It's nice to see there is a lot of congruence, I'm not going mad. :)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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