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Re: Origins of user stories

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  • Malapine
    ... For any application, you can think of anti-stories that would please some users, but harm other users or stakeholders. These are often useful for testing
    Message 1 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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      --- Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:
      > The inmate example is an interesting case. For some applications,
      > the inmates might be the *users*, not just stakeholders.

      For any application, you can think of anti-stories that would
      please some users, but harm other users or stakeholders. These
      are often useful for testing purposes.

      As an ATM user, I want the machine to dispense money without
      debiting my account, so I can spend more.

      As an elevator passenger, I want the car to take me straight to
      the lobby and not stop on any other floors, so I can get out
      of the building sooner.

      etc.
    • Theresa Forster (home)
      Your ATM story is interesting but wouldn t that be in odds with the epic, of A machine to dispense cash from the users account if they have the funds. Stories
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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        Your ATM story is interesting but wouldn't that be in odds with the epic, of
        A machine to dispense cash from the users account if they have the funds.

        Stories are good for exploring the functionality of a system and showing up edge cases. I remember reading somewhere that user stories are a reminder for the developer to have the conversation. And that is usually with the stakeholder who is part of your team and not all users of the system. For instance an accountant who works for sage when you are working on the next version of sage, any company who purchases the product is potentially the stakeholder but there is a designated person who speaks for the stakeholder.

        Theresa

        Sent from my iPad

        On 1 Apr 2013, at 19:38, "Malapine" <madbadrabbit@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > --- Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:
        > > The inmate example is an interesting case. For some applications,
        > > the inmates might be the *users*, not just stakeholders.
        >
        > For any application, you can think of anti-stories that would
        > please some users, but harm other users or stakeholders. These
        > are often useful for testing purposes.
        >
        > As an ATM user, I want the machine to dispense money without
        > debiting my account, so I can spend more.
        >
        > As an elevator passenger, I want the car to take me straight to
        > the lobby and not stop on any other floors, so I can get out
        > of the building sooner.
        >
        > etc.
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Larry Brunelle
        ... [snip] ... [snip] Are you running for election somewhere? :-)
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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          Malapine wrote:
          >
          [snip]

          > As an ATM user, I want the machine to dispense money without
          > debiting my account, so I can spend more.

          [snip]

          Are you running for election somewhere? :-)
        • JeffGrigg
          ... Since when are the users of a system not stakeholders? They re the ones who have to live with the system every day.
          Message 4 of 24 , Apr 2, 2013
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            --- Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:
            > The inmate example is an interesting case. For some
            > applications, the inmates might be the *users*, not
            > just stakeholders.

            Since when are the users of a system not stakeholders?

            They're the ones who have to live with the system every day.
          • Chet Hendrickson
            It is the Customer s job to balance the desires of all the stakeholders. In the inmate case, it may be prudent for her to not provide all the features they
            Message 5 of 24 , Apr 2, 2013
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              It is the Customer's job to balance the desires of all the stakeholders. In the inmate case, it may be prudent for her to not provide all the features they may wish.

              chet


              Chet Hendrickson
              lists@...



              On Apr 2, 2013, at 4:00 AM, JeffGrigg <jeffreytoddgrigg@...> wrote:

              > --- Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:
              > > The inmate example is an interesting case. For some
              > > applications, the inmates might be the *users*, not
              > > just stakeholders.
              >
              > Since when are the users of a system not stakeholders?
              >
              > They're the ones who have to live with the system every day.
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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