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Re: Zero Bugs vs Scale ( was Re: [XP] Back of the Door Sticky Note Issue Tracking.)

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hi John, ... Do you work one day at a time? Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both feet, and your
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 13, 2013
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      Hi John,

      On Mar 13, 2013, at 4:24 PM, John Carter <john.carter@...> wrote:

      > Anybody have any observations on Zero Defects vs Scale?


      Do you work one day at a time?

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both feet, and your tail, to get someplace better.
      Of course you might plummet to the earth and die, but probably not: you were made for this.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JeffGrigg
      ... It turns out that our industry has ridiculously low standards. Embarrassingly low standards. Well of course you will never achieve /absolutely zero/
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 16, 2013
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        --- John Carter <john.carter@...> wrote:
        > One push back I always get is "You can't expect zero bugs
        > on the scale of software we're doing (200+ man years multi-
        > threaded embedded C). Of course you don't get (many) defects
        > on small codebases... but our defect injection / discovery /
        > fix rates are quite inline with industry standards text books
        > on large scale software."
        >
        > Anybody have any observations on Zero Defects vs Scale?

        It turns out that our industry has ridiculously low standards. Embarrassingly low standards.

        Well of course you will never achieve /absolutely zero/ defects. But you get the benefits from using processes that can achieve a /vanishingly small/ defect rate, and honestly trying to hit zero most of the time. And when mistakes happen, you fix them and move on.

        It turns out that there really is no need to maintain a database full of known defects that we are "managing" -- meaning that we are ignoring them, for the most part.

        Do you want the software?

        Do you want it to work?
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