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Re: [XP] Scrum, and Revolution

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  • M. Manca
    ... And with less money... (also if I am not American but Italian and I live in Italy I am a President Obama supporter, funding the campaign, twitting and so
    Message 1 of 167 , Dec 17, 2012
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      Il 17/12/2012 20:29, John Roth ha scritto:
      >
      >
      > Steven,
      >
      > While I agree that rebranding is unlikely to work, I don't think things
      > are quite as bad as you portray. My impression is that a lot of the
      > younger generation that's really into open source projects has gotten
      > the message, frequently through painful experience.
      >
      > There's also a new case study available: the development effort behind
      > President Obama's reelection campaign. The story I've heard is that the
      > tech team did it using fine-grained incremental requirements and
      > delivery, while Governor Romney's effort (Orca) was based on a "big
      > bang" single delivery at the end of development model.
      >
      > As I understand it, there was quite a bit of confusion from the customer
      > side, who were expecting a big requirements effort up front. However,
      > the results speak for themselves.
      >
      And with less money... (also if I am not American but Italian and I live
      in Italy I am a President Obama supporter, funding the campaign,
      twitting and so on. After the next 4 years you may give us him for a
      while as Prime Minister, I think he should find a lot of things to do in
      Italy :-) ).
      >
      >
      > John Roth
      >
      > On 12/17/12 11:59 AM, Steven Gordon wrote:
      > > Tim,
      > >
      > > You write that "when people are really into continual improvement and
      > > frequent delivery, scrum is a powerhouse" and conclude that "We probably
      > > need a new banner to fly over the proven practices. But we need more
      > > attention to the reason that they work than the mechanics of
      > managing those
      > > practices."
      > >
      > > What difference does a new banner make when we just focus on the
      > same good
      > > practices? Most of us fully explain why they work and how to make them
      > > work, but apparently the message does not come across.
      > >
      > > Agile in a different name would break down in the same way it has now,
      > > unless we have a remedy for the organizational dysfunctionalities that
      > > prevent agile from truly being adopted in the later adopters. It is not
      > > that nobody has explained why it works well enough; it is that either
      > > nobody knows how to defeat corporate antibodies or we have not teamed up
      > > with the people who do.
      > >
      > > Unfortunately, rebranding now would work even worse that Agile did. The
      > > original early adopters of agile would have no reason to adopt what they
      > > are already doing under a different name, so there will be no
      > momentum to
      > > get the rebranded movement to the later adopter stages where knowing
      > how to
      > > defeat the corporate antibodies would make a difference.
      > >
      > > We can continue on the current course and win some individual
      > "battles" in
      > > the software development arena, but from a global point of view, the
      > state
      > > of things will not change much. Winning the global "war" can only be
      > > accomplished in the organizational change arena, not in the software
      > > development arena.
      > >
      > > Steven Gordon
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, Dec 17, 2012 at 10:51 AM, Tim Ottinger<linux_tim@...
      > <mailto:linux_tim%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
      > >
      > >> **
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>> What is there to do except develop the silver bullet for software
      > >>> development?
      > >> I don't know that a revolutionary method is necessary, but I agree that
      > >> "compliance scrum" is not getting us where we want to go.
      > >>
      > >> When I spoke at the Canterbury Software Summit in New Zealand, in
      > the time
      > >> the prior presenter left me (it was a good talk, but I trimmed 1/3
      > out of
      > >> my talk to fit the clock), I said what I believe to be the case: agile
      > >> practices don't work because they are agile; agile works because the
      > >> practices work.
      > >>
      > >> We tap into a well of real power when we do the things that really work
      > >> (and not the things that seem like good ideas). For instance, when
      > people
      > >> are really into continual improvement and frequent delivery, scrum is a
      > >> powerhouse. When they are not, then scrum piddles about making some
      > changes
      > >> and maybe even helping to improve things a little bit over the
      > course of
      > >> months/years.
      > >>
      > >> The trouble that a lot of companies have is:
      > >> * they blame the problems of the system on the citizens of the
      > system ("we
      > >> need better minions")
      > >> * the successful citizens of the system (typically managers&
      > architects)
      > >> refuse to change it
      > >>
      > >> * they demand a positive balance of devotion and commitment in
      > their favor
      > >> * they expect minions to produce more by sheer willpower and
      > application
      > >> of elbow-grease
      > >>
      > >> Agile (including scrum) originally was putting things right again,
      > using
      > >> feedback and team decision making and safe technical practices.
      > >>
      > >> Where scrum (often called "agile") goes wrong is with taking ceremonies
      > >> that belong to the new system and bolting them to the old.
      > >>
      > >> Certainly, a resurgence of the values won't "take" under the banner
      > of the
      > >> same groups who downgraded them.
      > >>
      > >> We probably need a new banner to fly over the proven practices. But we
      > >> need more attention to the reason that they work than the mechanics of
      > >> managing those practices.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Tim Ottinger<tottinge@...
      > <mailto:tottinge%40industriallogic.com>>
      > >> http://industriallogic.com/
      > >> http://agileotter.blogspot.com/
      > >>
      >
      >



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    • Tom Rossen
      Rob, Thanks for your kind offer. I am currently gainfully employed - until Feb. 2, when my current contract runs out. Northern Trust renewed it as many times
      Message 167 of 167 , Dec 30, 2012
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        Rob,

        Thanks for your kind offer. I am currently gainfully employed - until Feb.
        2, when my current contract runs out. Northern Trust renewed it as many
        times as they could, but there's a hard limit of 1.5 years.

        Re the high-performing teams: it's funny, but I really think I prefer
        working with an organization that's struggling with Agile. I'm extremely
        curious as to why XP practices, which seemed so obvious and satisfying when
        I first read Kent Beck's book years ago, are so frustrating for developers
        and managers who aren't used to them and didn't volunteer for them. I was
        rather seriously burned on my previous engagement when the company was
        acquired by a conglomerate and the policy of openness to Agile suddenly
        evaporated, so my insistence on TDD - which no longer seems as doomed as it
        would have been just a year ago, based on what I'm seeing now in the
        Chicago area - is protection against that sort of thing.

        So I'm curious about the high-performing teams you mention - at least in
        the Chicago area: I don't intend to relocate or commute a long distance (I
        worked in Madison, WI for several years after the dot-com-bomb wiped out
        the Chicago market - not a fun commute).

        Tom


        On Fri, Dec 28, 2012 at 2:30 PM, Rob Myers <rob.myers@...>wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Tom,
        >
        > Thanks for the supportive reply!
        >
        >
        > > 35 years in my case, and amen! Here's a snippet from the cover letter
        > I've
        > > been sending out recently:
        >
        > Tom, if you are not currently gainfully employed, I can point you to a few
        > truly high-performing teams across the country. They are in the minority,
        > as most software/IT organizations struggle to change those
        > command-and-control cultures, and to foster passion and creativity in both
        > Product and Development areas.
        >
        > > *I just thought of an analogy to explain why I am so single-minded about
        >
        > > TDD. Suppose you need an operation and you're looking for a hospital to
        > do
        > > it. A major hospital sends you a wonderful brochure explaining how
        > > successful they are, what a high-tech surgical suite they have,, etc.,
        > etc.
        > > But when you call up and ask them whether the surgeons wash their hands
        > > before operating, they say, "Why would we want to do that?" Oh yes,
        > > surgery was practiced for centuries before surgeons ever scrubbed up -
        > it's
        > > a great tradition. But I don't think you'd want to have anything to do
        > with
        > > a hospital like that. That's how I feel about TDD. It's a matter of
        > > funda**mental
        > > software hygiene. *
        >
        > It's a perfect analogy. Scott Bain uses this in his book /Emergent Design/
        > as one example of how software development is similar to surgery. (Aside:
        > Apologies if I popped an original-idea bubble: So often I find I think of
        > something original, only to spot it in a blog post the next day. It's the
        > Newton-Leibniz Effect ;-) The medical field provides an analogy that gets
        > us much farther than bridge-building. Of course, no analogy is perfect, but
        > I often find myself thinking "Doctor, it hurts when I do *this*!" ;-)
        >
        > Happy Holidays!
        >
        >
        > Rob
        >
        > Rob.Myers@...
        > Twitter: @agilecoach
        > http://www.agileInstitute.com/
        >
        >
        >


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