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Re: Is software written by an XP team "different"?

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  • MarvinToll.com
    Sure... this is how the two character acronym emerged... trying to balance communication flexibility with pattern clarity. Said another way, we wanted to
    Message 1 of 51 , Apr 11, 2012
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      Sure... this is how the two character acronym emerged... trying to balance communication flexibility with pattern clarity.

      Said another way, we wanted to clearly express pattern usage but avoid consuming two many characters in a name.

      http://PatternEnabled.com

      There is another point here... of all the "thousands of patterns" you mentioned... we honed the list down to less than 30 that are consistently useful in a Successful Large Enterprise (SLE) business context... AS A STARTING POINT.

      We did not limit the use of patterns or mandate using exclusively from this list... we simply said... if you choose to use one of these patterns as a starting point please communicate that clearly in code so others can see what you are doing.

      George Cowan offers a wonderful description in the form of a question:

      "Is the source completely transparent in how it does everything and you can understand exactly what is going on in every section at a glance?"


      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "JeffGrigg" <jeffreytoddgrigg@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have no problem with using names from typical pattern documents in the names of the classes (or methods, etc), as a starting point.
      >
      > Except that there are thousands of patterns. And the names in the pattern documentation can be quite arbitrary.
      >
      > And, more importantly, using good names that are relevant and appropriate to your business is generally better than rigid adherence to arbitrary "standard" names.
      >
      > Like the Command pattern...
      > "DoThisCommand" and "DoThatCommand" is fine...
      > Unless it makes more sense to call them "Action"s, for instance.
      >
    • MarvinToll.com
      Sure... this is how the two character acronym emerged... trying to balance communication flexibility with pattern clarity. Said another way, we wanted to
      Message 51 of 51 , Apr 11, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Sure... this is how the two character acronym emerged... trying to balance communication flexibility with pattern clarity.

        Said another way, we wanted to clearly express pattern usage but avoid consuming two many characters in a name.

        http://PatternEnabled.com

        There is another point here... of all the "thousands of patterns" you mentioned... we honed the list down to less than 30 that are consistently useful in a Successful Large Enterprise (SLE) business context... AS A STARTING POINT.

        We did not limit the use of patterns or mandate using exclusively from this list... we simply said... if you choose to use one of these patterns as a starting point please communicate that clearly in code so others can see what you are doing.

        George Cowan offers a wonderful description in the form of a question:

        "Is the source completely transparent in how it does everything and you can understand exactly what is going on in every section at a glance?"


        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "JeffGrigg" <jeffreytoddgrigg@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have no problem with using names from typical pattern documents in the names of the classes (or methods, etc), as a starting point.
        >
        > Except that there are thousands of patterns. And the names in the pattern documentation can be quite arbitrary.
        >
        > And, more importantly, using good names that are relevant and appropriate to your business is generally better than rigid adherence to arbitrary "standard" names.
        >
        > Like the Command pattern...
        > "DoThisCommand" and "DoThatCommand" is fine...
        > Unless it makes more sense to call them "Action"s, for instance.
        >
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