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[XP] Re: Software Agility: Seven Design Concerns

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  • MarvinToll.com
    Chet, Thanks for picking up on this. Most people talk about the more prolific Class patterns vs. the more controverial Method patterns. Truthfully, the method
    Message 1 of 84 , Apr 5, 2012
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      Chet,

      Thanks for picking up on this.

      Most people talk about the more prolific Class patterns vs. the more controverial Method patterns.

      Truthfully, the method pattern usage is relatively new for me and I am open to discovering that it is a fundamentally bad idea.

      You'll notice that there are only four method patterns listed... and I'm currently learning if this is effective for a team.

      However, you make a great point about exposing implementation...

      I'm like everyone else... have a bit of emotional inertia around current approach/thinking... give me some time/space to ruminate on your thoughts please.

      Thanks again,
      Marvin


      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Chet Hendrickson <lists@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Marvin,
      >
      > Wednesday, April 4, 2012, 11:32:39 PM, you wrote:
      >
      > Said another way... it is fine to use patterns... and it is fine to not use them. However, if you do use them please find a strategy to communicate clearly what pattern (starting point) you are using.
      >
      > I don't believe I agree with this. When we name a method in such a way as to encode a pattern, we have exposed implementation and this is generally agreed to be a bad thing. Every user of that method is now tightly coupled to the implementation. Coupling is bad. The using methods will now have to be aware of changes that take place in the exposed method. This increases our workload, without giving us a concrete benefit.
      >
      > Our other options are to dispatch to a private explaining method or to use a code comment. I find both of these unsatisfying. Since they share another problem of your original solution, they are not guaranteed to be updated when the method is changed to no longer employ the pattern.
      >
      > --
      > Best regards,
      > Chet Hendrickson mailto:lists@...
      > Check out our upcoming CSM Plus courses @
      > http://hendricksonxp.com/index.php?option=com_eventlist&Itemid=28
    • Lior Friedman
      ... at the risk of opening a tangent thread, I would say not really. Given the right tools,know how and will, (almost) any code can be tested. I believe that
      Message 84 of 84 , Apr 9, 2012
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        On Mon, Apr 9, 2012 at 3:47 PM, Adrian Howard <adrianh@...>wrote:

        > **
        > Can we usefully say things about degrees of testability?
        >

        at the risk of opening a tangent thread, I would say not really.
        Given the right tools,know how and will, (almost) any code can be tested.

        I believe that the term "tesability" is many time used to describe the
        "ease of writing tests" or as a proxy to "properly designed" code. So I
        find it more useful to talk about what makes good code.

        Lior


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