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Re: [XP] How does the work in iteration gets inspected in XP?

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  • Joshua
    Hi, Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected during Sprint Review. How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed? Is
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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      Hi,

      Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected during Sprint Review. How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed? Is there any dedicated ceremony in XP to review the work done?

      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Dave Rooney <dave.rooney@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 12-03-20 11:45 AM, Joshua Partogi wrote:
      > > Hiya,
      > >
      > > I am wondering how does the output of the iteration gets inspected since I
      > > could not find this in any literature about XP. Does the XP customer
      > > inspect the software everyday as written in "Customer Tests" as opposed to
      > > at the end of the iteration like Sprint Review in Scrum?
      > >
      > > Thanks.
      > >
      >
      > Hi Josh,
      >
      > What do you mean by "inspected"? A code review? Accepting completed
      > stories? Something different?
      >
      > Dave...
      > *Dave Rooney* | Agile Coach and Co-founder
      > Westboro Systems <http://www.westborosystems.com/> - Agile Coaching,
      > Training, Organizational Transformation.
      > Blog <http://practicalagility.blogspot.com> | Twitter
      > <http://twitter.com/daverooneyca> | LinkedIn
      > <http://www.linkedin.com/in/daverooneyagile> | Phone: +1.855.AGILE123
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • RonJeffries
      ... In Sprint Review the stakeholders see the accepted backlog items for the Sprint. They do not inspect the code. The Sprint Review is used to get ideas for
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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        On Mar 21, 2012, at 9:31 PM, Joshua wrote:

        > Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected during Sprint Review.

        In Sprint Review the stakeholders see the accepted backlog items for the Sprint. They do not inspect the code. The Sprint Review is used to get ideas for new things to do and to learn a bit from what has gone before, in preparation for Sprint Retrospective.

        > How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed? Is there any dedicated ceremony in XP to review the work done?


        No. XP has no such named ceremony. The Planning Game / Small Releases / Customer Tests / Whole Team cycle provides the visibility. If I were writing it up today I would emphasize retrospectives but would personally not add a Sprint Review equivalent.

        If I were to read between your lines, it sounds to me as if you are trying to find out about a specific process to do. Neither Scrum nor XP are specific processes in that sense. They create an environment where the team (which includes the business-side people) can see what is going on and improve it. The specifics are up to the team.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Everything that needs to be said has already been said.
        But since no one was listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre Gide



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Adam Sroka
        In original XP as I understood it, and as we practiced it in my early days, we did pretty much the same thing Scrum does. The main difference is that we had
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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          In original XP as I understood it, and as we practiced it in my early days,
          we did pretty much the same thing Scrum does. The main difference is that
          we had just one weekly meeting where we played the planning game, and that
          incorporated both what you call the review and the planning meeting.
          Certain things were a little less formalized, but the way we did it working
          software was always demoed in the conversation leading up to what we would
          do next.

          Later on things evolved and we started demoing more continuously by having
          a running version of the software as it currently looked in source control
          always available to the customer to play with. We would encourage them to
          play with it and give us feedback.

          Some teams now do continuous delivery to production. So, the review is: "go
          look at the site." The customer has to pay a lot of attention then.
          Sometimes they ask you to undo things!

          XP is no longer really just one thing, because a lot of folks have been
          doing it for a while and learning and adapting to create their own way of
          doing things. So, there are a number of flavors now that descend from XP to
          one degree or another and it all just kind of gets blanketed under
          Agile-something-or-other.

          On Wed, Mar 21, 2012 at 6:31 PM, Joshua <joshua.java@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected
          > during Sprint Review. How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed?
          > Is there any dedicated ceremony in XP to review the work done?
          >
          > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Dave Rooney <dave.rooney@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > On 12-03-20 11:45 AM, Joshua Partogi wrote:
          > > > Hiya,
          > > >
          > > > I am wondering how does the output of the iteration gets inspected
          > since I
          > > > could not find this in any literature about XP. Does the XP customer
          > > > inspect the software everyday as written in "Customer Tests" as
          > opposed to
          > > > at the end of the iteration like Sprint Review in Scrum?
          > > >
          > > > Thanks.
          > > >
          > >
          > > Hi Josh,
          > >
          > > What do you mean by "inspected"? A code review? Accepting completed
          > > stories? Something different?
          > >
          > > Dave...
          > > *Dave Rooney* | Agile Coach and Co-founder
          > > Westboro Systems <http://www.westborosystems.com/> - Agile Coaching,
          > > Training, Organizational Transformation.
          > > Blog <http://practicalagility.blogspot.com> | Twitter
          > > <http://twitter.com/daverooneyca> | LinkedIn
          > > <http://www.linkedin.com/in/daverooneyagile> | Phone: +1.855.AGILE123
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Joshua Partogi
          Thanks Ron. From what I understand, an iteration is 2 weeks long. So what happens at the end of the iteration? ... during Sprint Review. ... Sprint. They do
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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            Thanks Ron. From what I understand, an iteration is 2 weeks long. So what
            happens at the end of the iteration?

            On Thursday, March 22, 2012, RonJeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > On Mar 21, 2012, at 9:31 PM, Joshua wrote:
            >
            >> Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected
            during Sprint Review.
            >
            > In Sprint Review the stakeholders see the accepted backlog items for the
            Sprint. They do not inspect the code. The Sprint Review is used to get
            ideas for new things to do and to learn a bit from what has gone before, in
            preparation for Sprint Retrospective.
            >
            >> How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed? Is there any
            dedicated ceremony in XP to review the work done?
            >
            > No. XP has no such named ceremony. The Planning Game / Small Releases /
            Customer Tests / Whole Team cycle provides the visibility. If I were
            writing it up today I would emphasize retrospectives but would personally
            not add a Sprint Review equivalent.
            >
            > If I were to read between your lines, it sounds to me as if you are
            trying to find out about a specific process to do. Neither Scrum nor XP are
            specific processes in that sense. They create an environment where the team
            (which includes the business-side people) can see what is going on and
            improve it. The specifics are up to the team.
            >
            > Ron Jeffries
            > www.XProgramming.com
            > Everything that needs to be said has already been said.
            > But since no one was listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre
            Gide
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            --
            @jpartogi


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • RonJeffries
            Joshua, ... Another planning meeting. Which of the XP books have you read so far? Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com If another does not intend offense, it is
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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              Joshua,

              On Mar 21, 2012, at 10:01 PM, Joshua Partogi wrote:

              > Thanks Ron. From what I understand, an iteration is 2 weeks long. So what
              > happens at the end of the iteration?


              Another planning meeting. Which of the XP books have you read so far?

              Ron Jeffries
              www.XProgramming.com
              If another does not intend offense, it is wrong for me to seek it;
              if another does indeed intend offense, it is foolish for me to permit it.
              -- Kelly Easterley



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Adam Sroka
              1-4 weeks with preference for the shorter... Though eventually most of the community came to favor one-week iterations. Some now have dropped iterations.
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 21, 2012
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                1-4 weeks "with preference for the shorter..." Though eventually most
                of the community came to favor one-week iterations. Some now have
                dropped iterations.

                On Wed, Mar 21, 2012 at 7:01 PM, Joshua Partogi <joshua.java@...> wrote:
                > Thanks Ron. From what I understand, an iteration is 2 weeks long. So what
                > happens at the end of the iteration?
                >
                > On Thursday, March 22, 2012, RonJeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >> On Mar 21, 2012, at 9:31 PM, Joshua wrote:
                >>
                >>> Sorry to confuse you. In Scrum the work within the Sprint gets inspected
                > during Sprint Review.
                >>
                >> In Sprint Review the stakeholders see the accepted backlog items for the
                > Sprint. They do not inspect the code. The Sprint Review is used to get
                > ideas for new things to do and to learn a bit from what has gone before, in
                > preparation for Sprint Retrospective.
                >>
                >>> How does the work in the XP Iteration gets reviewed? Is there any
                > dedicated ceremony in XP to review the work done?
                >>
                >> No. XP has no such named ceremony. The Planning Game / Small Releases /
                > Customer Tests / Whole Team cycle provides the visibility. If I were
                > writing it up today I would emphasize retrospectives but would personally
                > not add a Sprint Review equivalent.
                >>
                >> If I were to read between your lines, it sounds to me as if you are
                > trying to find out about a specific process to do. Neither Scrum nor XP are
                > specific processes in that sense. They create an environment where the team
                > (which includes the business-side people) can see what is going on and
                > improve it. The specifics are up to the team.
                >>
                >> Ron Jeffries
                >> www.XProgramming.com
                >> Everything that needs to be said has already been said.
                >> But since no one was listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre
                > Gide
                >>
                >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >>
                >>
                >
                > --
                > @jpartogi
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
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