Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Fun with Cards and Tape

Expand Messages
  • George Paci
    All, My team keeps talking about constructing one of those story card boards William Pietri built ( http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#storycards ),
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 24, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      All,

      My team keeps talking about constructing one of those story card boards
      William Pietri built (
      http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#storycards ),
      but right now we have a 4-by-7foot* patch of wall and some blue painter's
      tape (which is a particular grade of masking tape; go look it up on
      Wikipedia
      for the usual stupendous amount of detail).

      Our Soon/On Deck/In Progress/Coded/Accepted columns are demarcated by the
      tape. We've also experimented with a couple ways of attaching the cards
      to the wall with the tape:

      1) Make a loop, put it on the back of the card in the middle near the top.
      This is quick, easy, and obvious. Unfortunately, it makes it hard to
      work with the cards on a table: you have to take the tape loops off all
      of them, and put them back on when you're done. One solution is to
      keep the loop on and stick a blank card on the back of the story card.
      This lets you move cards around, but it's still a little awkward and
      time-consuming, and makes it harder to stack the cards.

      2) Put a twisted piece of tape on the wall (I got this idea from an Open
      Space
      at some conference or other). This way, the tape sticks to the
      wall, and
      the cards stick to the tape, but are easily detachable. The downside is
      that the cards can stick too much, and pull the tape away from the wall.
      It's also hard to twist the tape without creating a tangle and
      ultimately
      a tape ball. An advantage of this and the following methods is that
      they
      all keep the cards in a straight line.

      3) Make a big tape loop on the wall. Make a foot-long loop, sticky side
      out,
      and put it on the wall vertically. Stick the cards to that. This
      didn't
      work well at all, since there was a lot of slack in the loop. Sometimes
      the card pulled away from the tape, but sometimes the tape pulled away
      from the wall.

      4) Make a tape monorail. Take a foot-long piece of tape, put it against the
      wall sticky side out, fold back the top and bottom a bit to stick it to
      the wall, then add cross-pieces (sticky side in) about three times
      as long
      as the tape is wide. Spacing them about one width apart works for
      us,but
      one of the advantages of this method is that you can adjust the
      stickiness
      by varying the spacing. Now you can put a card against the wall
      where the
      monorail tracks are, press on it in the middle, and it sticks. Pull on
      one edge, and it comes off easily (no fuss, no tearing).

      I like this solution the best, though some members of the team prefer some
      of the other solutions. One elaboration is to use half-width tape
      for the
      cross-pieces (hint: cut the tape in half while it's coming off the
      roll).

      Upon further reflection, I guess most of these methods would work
      horizontally,
      as well, but I don't have any direct experience with that (except for (2),
      which was horizontal at the conference I encountered it at).


      Incidentally, about 30 feet** of wall in our team room is floor-to-ceiling
      whiteboard, courtesy of special paint. The space below 2 feet and above 8
      feet is unused, but the rest of it is covered with useful information. The
      only downside is we probably wait too long to erase stuff, since we don't
      actually need to make space very often.

      I hope our experiences prove helpful to somebody else out there.

      --George Paci gpaci at tiac dot net


      PS: The company I work for is hiring great programmers; Python is a plus but
      not anabsolute requirement. We're located just outside Washington, DC.
      Email me if you're interested.


      (* For Canadians: 1.33-by-2.33-beaver-pelt)
      (** 10 C.b.p.)
    • Curtis Cooley
      ... current gig, but the facilities director claimed its crap and degrades too fast. How s it holding up? -- ... Curtis Cooley curtis@industriallogic.com
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 24, 2012
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 7:34 AM, George Paci <gpaci@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        > Incidentally, about 30 feet** of wall in our team room is floor-to-ceiling
        > whiteboard, courtesy of special paint. The space below 2 feet and above 8
        > feet is unused, but the rest of it is covered with useful information. The
        > only downside is we probably wait too long to erase stuff, since we don't
        > actually need to make space very often.
        >
        > How is the whiteboard paint working for you? We tried to get that at our
        current gig, but the facilities director claimed its crap and degrades too
        fast. How's it holding up?


        --
        --------------------------------------
        Curtis Cooley
        curtis@...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • George Paci
        Hey, Curtis, ... Unfortunately, we ve only had it about three months on the long wall, and maybe six months on the short wall, so I don t have any experience
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 25, 2012
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Hey, Curtis,

          On 2/24/12 4:08 PM, Curtis Cooley wrote:
          > On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 7:34 AM, George Paci<gpaci@...> wrote:
          >
          >> **
          >>
          >> Incidentally, about 30 feet** of wall in our team room is floor-to-ceiling
          >> whiteboard, courtesy of special paint. The space below 2 feet and above 8
          >> feet is unused, but the rest of it is covered with useful information. The
          >> only downside is we probably wait too long to erase stuff, since we don't
          >> actually need to make space very often.
          >>
          > How is the whiteboard paint working for you? We tried to get that at our

          > current gig, but the facilities director claimed its crap and degrades too
          > fast. How's it holding up?

          Unfortunately, we've only had it about three months on the long wall,
          and maybe six months on the
          short wall, so I don't have any experience with it in the long run. I
          assume repainting would be about
          as much of a pain as painting: unable to use the room one afternoon for
          the sanding, and the next
          day for the painting. If I had to go through that every year to get
          this much whiteboard space, I'd
          gladly do it. Heck, schedule a team off-site for that day if you're
          worried about a productivity hit.
          (I assume the impact on programmer time >> cost of painting labor >>
          cost of materials.)

          I can tell you that if you do it in a conference room (oh, yeah: we have
          it on three of the walls in
          our conference room, which I didn't count, so maybe another 20') you
          might want to think about
          a chair rail, since we've worn through a spot or two. Incidentally, we
          have roller blinds (roll-up
          shades) in the conference room that we can pull down when we bring in
          people in who haven't
          signed an NDA or whatever.

          Also, there is some ghosting when you leave drawings up for several
          days. But scribbling over it
          with a dry-erase maker, waiting, and re-erasing gets rid of it. So it's
          not as awesome as ceramic
          whiteboards, but it's at least as good as melamine (see below).

          Another (possibly cheaper) approach is to get some 4x8' white melamine
          panels from the local
          home-improvement mega-store and mount them on (or against) the wall.
          Those I *know* degrade
          more quickly, but since they're $12 each, you might not care (assuming
          said store will deliver).
          Maybe mounting one on a rolling chalkboard would work; if you use a few
          bolts, it should be easy
          to swap it out for a new one every year. And if you have room to stock
          replacements, you can just
          drill all the holes at once, while they're stacked up.

          Another fillip: you can get a coat of ferromagnetic paint under the
          whiteboard paint, thus giving you
          a whiteboard you can put magnets on. I wonder if you can just take a
          thin sheet of steel, slap some
          whiteboard paint on it, and use it like you would the melamine above.

          Anyway, the main thing is: WHITEBOARDS RULE. The more whiteboard space,
          the better.

          Kevin Kelley talks about the melamine and the ceramic-coated metal
          sheets (which, at $200 for a
          4x8, are significantly more expensive) here:
          http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/000679.php

          A serious melamine fan gives step-by-step instructions here:
          http://www.white-boards.org/

          And these guys may be a little *too* into it:
          http://kohworkn.com/big-8x4-diy-dry-erase-board-for-around-25/

          Finally, if you just want a whiteboard and not an entire wall, you can
          use glass:
          http://gravysd.blogspot.com/2011/03/think-make-inspire-diy-dry-erase-board.html

          --George gpaci at tiac dot net


          Warning: Watching a Public Service Announcement
          Shortens Your Life by 30 Seconds
        • Buddha Buck
          ... We ve had melamine panels on the walls of our space for years now. The only issue I ve seen with degrading (that I ve noticed) is when a coworker tried to
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 25, 2012
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            On Sat, Feb 25, 2012 at 4:44 PM, George Paci <gpaci@...> wrote:
            > Another (possibly cheaper) approach is to get some 4x8' white melamine
            > panels from the local
            > home-improvement mega-store and mount them on (or against) the wall.
            > Those I *know* degrade
            > more quickly, but since they're $12 each, you might not care (assuming
            > said store will deliver).
            > Maybe mounting one on a rolling chalkboard would work; if you use a few
            > bolts, it should be easy
            > to swap it out for a new one every year.  And if you have room to stock
            > replacements, you can just
            > drill all the holes at once, while they're stacked up.

            We've had melamine panels on the walls of our space for years now.
            The only issue I've seen with degrading (that I've noticed) is when a
            coworker tried to erase a permanent-marker mark too vigorously and
            abraded away a few square inches in the middle of a board.

            After a day or so, it does get hard to erase stuff, especially with
            certain colors (red goes on easy and comes off hard, for instance),
            but we have found that dry erase cleaning liquid works wonders for
            cleaning even the stubbornest marks.
          • Steven Smith
            They make sticky notecards that work great for wall/table usage, I ve found. Or just standard sticky/Post-It notes. Steve ... -- Steve Smith
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 27, 2012
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              They make sticky notecards that work great for wall/table usage, I've
              found. Or just standard sticky/Post-It notes.

              Steve


              On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 10:34 AM, George Paci <gpaci@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > All,
              >
              > My team keeps talking about constructing one of those story card boards
              > William Pietri built (
              > http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#storycards ),
              > but right now we have a 4-by-7foot* patch of wall and some blue painter's
              > tape (which is a particular grade of masking tape; go look it up on
              > Wikipedia
              > for the usual stupendous amount of detail).
              >
              > Our Soon/On Deck/In Progress/Coded/Accepted columns are demarcated by the
              > tape. We've also experimented with a couple ways of attaching the cards
              > to the wall with the tape:
              >
              > 1) Make a loop, put it on the back of the card in the middle near the top.
              > This is quick, easy, and obvious. Unfortunately, it makes it hard to
              > work with the cards on a table: you have to take the tape loops off all
              > of them, and put them back on when you're done. One solution is to
              > keep the loop on and stick a blank card on the back of the story card.
              > This lets you move cards around, but it's still a little awkward and
              > time-consuming, and makes it harder to stack the cards.
              >
              > 2) Put a twisted piece of tape on the wall (I got this idea from an Open
              > Space
              > at some conference or other). This way, the tape sticks to the
              > wall, and
              > the cards stick to the tape, but are easily detachable. The downside is
              > that the cards can stick too much, and pull the tape away from the wall.
              > It's also hard to twist the tape without creating a tangle and
              > ultimately
              > a tape ball. An advantage of this and the following methods is that
              > they
              > all keep the cards in a straight line.
              >
              > 3) Make a big tape loop on the wall. Make a foot-long loop, sticky side
              > out,
              > and put it on the wall vertically. Stick the cards to that. This
              > didn't
              > work well at all, since there was a lot of slack in the loop. Sometimes
              > the card pulled away from the tape, but sometimes the tape pulled away
              > from the wall.
              >
              > 4) Make a tape monorail. Take a foot-long piece of tape, put it against the
              > wall sticky side out, fold back the top and bottom a bit to stick it to
              > the wall, then add cross-pieces (sticky side in) about three times
              > as long
              > as the tape is wide. Spacing them about one width apart works for
              > us,but
              > one of the advantages of this method is that you can adjust the
              > stickiness
              > by varying the spacing. Now you can put a card against the wall
              > where the
              > monorail tracks are, press on it in the middle, and it sticks. Pull on
              > one edge, and it comes off easily (no fuss, no tearing).
              >
              > I like this solution the best, though some members of the team prefer some
              > of the other solutions. One elaboration is to use half-width tape
              > for the
              > cross-pieces (hint: cut the tape in half while it's coming off the
              > roll).
              >
              > Upon further reflection, I guess most of these methods would work
              > horizontally,
              > as well, but I don't have any direct experience with that (except for (2),
              > which was horizontal at the conference I encountered it at).
              >
              > Incidentally, about 30 feet** of wall in our team room is floor-to-ceiling
              > whiteboard, courtesy of special paint. The space below 2 feet and above 8
              > feet is unused, but the rest of it is covered with useful information. The
              > only downside is we probably wait too long to erase stuff, since we don't
              > actually need to make space very often.
              >
              > I hope our experiences prove helpful to somebody else out there.
              >
              > --George Paci gpaci at tiac dot net
              >
              > PS: The company I work for is hiring great programmers; Python is a plus
              > but
              > not anabsolute requirement. We're located just outside Washington, DC.
              > Email me if you're interested.
              >
              > (* For Canadians: 1.33-by-2.33-beaver-pelt)
              > (** 10 C.b.p.)
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Steve Smith
              http://Ardalis.com/
              http://twitter.com/ardalis


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Adam Sroka
              Get some of these: http://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Acid-Free-Restickable-Stick-Ounces/dp/B00006IFBO(They sell them at the office supply place near my house. I
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 27, 2012
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Get some of these:
                http://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Acid-Free-Restickable-Stick-Ounces/dp/B00006IFBO(They
                sell them at the office supply place near my house. I think the big
                chains carry it nationally, but I couldn't tell you which aisle to look
                in.)

                Apply liberally to the back of cards. When the cards lose their sticky like
                normal sticky notes do just slather some more on.

                On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 7:34 AM, George Paci <gpaci@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > All,
                >
                > My team keeps talking about constructing one of those story card boards
                > William Pietri built (
                > http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#storycards ),
                > but right now we have a 4-by-7foot* patch of wall and some blue painter's
                > tape (which is a particular grade of masking tape; go look it up on
                > Wikipedia
                > for the usual stupendous amount of detail).
                >
                > Our Soon/On Deck/In Progress/Coded/Accepted columns are demarcated by the
                > tape. We've also experimented with a couple ways of attaching the cards
                > to the wall with the tape:
                >
                > 1) Make a loop, put it on the back of the card in the middle near the top.
                > This is quick, easy, and obvious. Unfortunately, it makes it hard to
                > work with the cards on a table: you have to take the tape loops off all
                > of them, and put them back on when you're done. One solution is to
                > keep the loop on and stick a blank card on the back of the story card.
                > This lets you move cards around, but it's still a little awkward and
                > time-consuming, and makes it harder to stack the cards.
                >
                > 2) Put a twisted piece of tape on the wall (I got this idea from an Open
                > Space
                > at some conference or other). This way, the tape sticks to the
                > wall, and
                > the cards stick to the tape, but are easily detachable. The downside is
                > that the cards can stick too much, and pull the tape away from the wall.
                > It's also hard to twist the tape without creating a tangle and
                > ultimately
                > a tape ball. An advantage of this and the following methods is that
                > they
                > all keep the cards in a straight line.
                >
                > 3) Make a big tape loop on the wall. Make a foot-long loop, sticky side
                > out,
                > and put it on the wall vertically. Stick the cards to that. This
                > didn't
                > work well at all, since there was a lot of slack in the loop. Sometimes
                > the card pulled away from the tape, but sometimes the tape pulled away
                > from the wall.
                >
                > 4) Make a tape monorail. Take a foot-long piece of tape, put it against the
                > wall sticky side out, fold back the top and bottom a bit to stick it to
                > the wall, then add cross-pieces (sticky side in) about three times
                > as long
                > as the tape is wide. Spacing them about one width apart works for
                > us,but
                > one of the advantages of this method is that you can adjust the
                > stickiness
                > by varying the spacing. Now you can put a card against the wall
                > where the
                > monorail tracks are, press on it in the middle, and it sticks. Pull on
                > one edge, and it comes off easily (no fuss, no tearing).
                >
                > I like this solution the best, though some members of the team prefer some
                > of the other solutions. One elaboration is to use half-width tape
                > for the
                > cross-pieces (hint: cut the tape in half while it's coming off the
                > roll).
                >
                > Upon further reflection, I guess most of these methods would work
                > horizontally,
                > as well, but I don't have any direct experience with that (except for (2),
                > which was horizontal at the conference I encountered it at).
                >
                > Incidentally, about 30 feet** of wall in our team room is floor-to-ceiling
                > whiteboard, courtesy of special paint. The space below 2 feet and above 8
                > feet is unused, but the rest of it is covered with useful information. The
                > only downside is we probably wait too long to erase stuff, since we don't
                > actually need to make space very often.
                >
                > I hope our experiences prove helpful to somebody else out there.
                >
                > --George Paci gpaci at tiac dot net
                >
                > PS: The company I work for is hiring great programmers; Python is a plus
                > but
                > not anabsolute requirement. We're located just outside Washington, DC.
                > Email me if you're interested.
                >
                > (* For Canadians: 1.33-by-2.33-beaver-pelt)
                > (** 10 C.b.p.)
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.