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Re: [XP] Introverts, Agile and Creativity

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  • George Dinwiddie
    Adrian, ... Were they using the actual MBTI test instrument? -George -- ... * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com Software
    Message 1 of 68 , Feb 10, 2012
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      Adrian,

      On 2/10/12 11:16 AM, Adrian Howard wrote:
      >
      > On 10 Feb 2012, at 00:51, D.André Dhondt wrote:
      > [snip]
      >> Mostly--but a while ago I had a great conversation with Jeremy Lightsmith
      >> about how he takes the MBTI regularly--and his scores change over time, as
      >> well as in different environments.
      > [snip]
      >
      > I knew somebody twenty odd years ago at university who had a party
      > trick of being able to test for any requested MBTI description. It
      > coloured my opinion of the tests utility :-)

      Were they using the actual MBTI test instrument?

      -George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Adam Sroka
      Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers they see as
      Message 68 of 68 , Mar 19, 2012
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        Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers
        they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers
        they see as timid and geeky and since reviews are subjective anyway this
        bias tends to show up?

        That may sound a bit stereotypical, but as an extroverted programmer it's
        roughly how I feel about it with my own peers. I work hard to give the
        geeky guys equal time, but I definitely like the ones who are more like me
        better whether I want to admit it or not. Some of my best friends are
        managers.

        On Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 12:01 PM, Niels Krijger <niels@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed the
        > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > for the developer role).
        > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of what
        > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > but didn't prove significant.
        > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the manager
        > role it is not of major importance.
        >
        > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        >
        > Regards,
        > Niels
        >
        > 2012/3/19 Niels Krijger <niels.krijger@...>
        >
        > > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed
        > the
        > > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > > for the developer role).
        > > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of
        > what
        > > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > > but didn't prove significant.
        > > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the
        > manager
        > > role it is not of major importance.
        > >
        > > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Niels
        > >
        > >
        > > 2012/3/19 Curtis Cooley <curtis@...>
        > >
        > >> **
        >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 4:24 PM, Curtis Cooley <
        > curtis@...
        > >> >wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM, Acaz Souza Pereira <
        > >> acazsouza@...>wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> >> Pair Programming Considered Harmful?
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/03/pair-programming-considered-harmful/
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Nothing ground breaking here. Executive Summary:
        > >> >
        > >> > Each team needs to find a mix of solo, pairing, and group programming
        > >> that
        > >> > meets the needs of the team and project. And, by the way, it's
        > different
        > >> > for every team.
        > >> >
        > >> > No surprises here ;)
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >> After thinking about this, the whole article is pretty much non
        > sequitor.
        > >> It's based on the premise that creativity is the most important quality
        > of
        > >> a developer when building software, yet provide no evidence or arguments
        > >> to
        > >> prove that is the case. I assert it's not top priority, which is why
        > pair
        > >> programming works. If all it took was creativity, then I would agree
        > that
        > >> PP is harmful, but it doesn't, it takes more, much more, so it's not.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> --
        > >> --------------------------------------
        > >> Curtis Cooley
        > >> curtis@...
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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