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Re: [XP] Survive as introvert

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  • Dave Rooney
    ... It s all a spectrum, and it s not as simple as introversion vs. extraversion. I have consistently tested as an extravert, but I have always had times where
    Message 1 of 68 , Feb 9, 2012
      On 2012-02-09, at 5:58 PM, Steven Gordon wrote:

      > I think introversion is a spectrum rather than binary. I suspect most of
      > the more successful people who consider themselves introverted are only
      > slightly introverted and also possess other attributes that make it fairly
      > easy for them to compensate for their introversion.

      It's all a spectrum, and it's not as simple as introversion vs. extraversion.

      I have consistently tested as an extravert, but I have always had times where I needed to get away from absolutely freaking everyone to recharge. Then I found out that my particular 'combination' (ENFP) does require alone time to be able to recalibrate the brain.

      And then there are the people who think that all of the Jungian and Myers/Briggs personality traits are garbage.

      >
      > I also believe that a good team environment helps people compensate for
      > their "weaker" attributes, especially if they have other "stronger"
      > attributes to offer.

      Sure, I'd buy that.

      <just-for-fun>
      Way back in ought-three, I ran a poll here to collect the MBTI's for the people on the list. I didn't say why prior to running the poll, but the result confirmed something that I had observed... all but one of over 100 respondents had 'N' in their MBTI. I suspect that's the case with most people in the Pioneer and Early Adopter stages of the adoption curve, but I always wondered if there was something about the characteristics of Intuitors that predisposed them to gravitate towards Agile methods.
      </just-for-fun>

      Dave...
      Dave Rooney | Agile Coach and Co-founder
      Westboro Systems - Agile Coaching, Training, Organizational Transformation.
      Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Adam Sroka
      Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers they see as
      Message 68 of 68 , Mar 19, 2012
        Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers
        they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers
        they see as timid and geeky and since reviews are subjective anyway this
        bias tends to show up?

        That may sound a bit stereotypical, but as an extroverted programmer it's
        roughly how I feel about it with my own peers. I work hard to give the
        geeky guys equal time, but I definitely like the ones who are more like me
        better whether I want to admit it or not. Some of my best friends are
        managers.

        On Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 12:01 PM, Niels Krijger <niels@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed the
        > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > for the developer role).
        > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of what
        > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > but didn't prove significant.
        > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the manager
        > role it is not of major importance.
        >
        > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        >
        > Regards,
        > Niels
        >
        > 2012/3/19 Niels Krijger <niels.krijger@...>
        >
        > > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed
        > the
        > > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > > for the developer role).
        > > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of
        > what
        > > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > > but didn't prove significant.
        > > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the
        > manager
        > > role it is not of major importance.
        > >
        > > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Niels
        > >
        > >
        > > 2012/3/19 Curtis Cooley <curtis@...>
        > >
        > >> **
        >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 4:24 PM, Curtis Cooley <
        > curtis@...
        > >> >wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM, Acaz Souza Pereira <
        > >> acazsouza@...>wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> >> Pair Programming Considered Harmful?
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/03/pair-programming-considered-harmful/
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Nothing ground breaking here. Executive Summary:
        > >> >
        > >> > Each team needs to find a mix of solo, pairing, and group programming
        > >> that
        > >> > meets the needs of the team and project. And, by the way, it's
        > different
        > >> > for every team.
        > >> >
        > >> > No surprises here ;)
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >> After thinking about this, the whole article is pretty much non
        > sequitor.
        > >> It's based on the premise that creativity is the most important quality
        > of
        > >> a developer when building software, yet provide no evidence or arguments
        > >> to
        > >> prove that is the case. I assert it's not top priority, which is why
        > pair
        > >> programming works. If all it took was creativity, then I would agree
        > that
        > >> PP is harmful, but it doesn't, it takes more, much more, so it's not.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> --
        > >> --------------------------------------
        > >> Curtis Cooley
        > >> curtis@...
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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