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Re: [XP] Introverts, Agile and Creativity

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  • Keith Ray
    I recall an article about CEOs who describe themselves as introverts. Not finding the exact article, but here s a quote that vein: Research analyzing the
    Message 1 of 68 , Feb 9, 2012
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      I recall an article about CEOs who describe themselves as introverts. Not finding the exact article, but here's a quote that vein:

      Research analyzing the results from a national representative sample of 3,009 people who have taken the Myers Briggs test shows that introverts actually outnumber extroverts, 50.8% to 49.3%. More men (54.1%) than women (47.5%) are introverted. And lest you think the title of Gelberg's book [The Successful Introvert] is an oxymoron, consider this: Berkshire Hathaway (BRKA, Fortune 500) CEO Warren Buffett, Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) chairman Bill Gates, Sara Lee (SLE, Fortune 500) CEO Brenda Barnes, Steven Spielberg, and Charles Schwab all describe themselves as introverts.

      http://money.cnn.com/2009/02/11/news/economy/introverts.fortune/index.htm


      --
      C. Keith Ray
      twitter: @ckeithray
      phone: 650-KEY-4RAY
      650-539-4729
      http://agilesolutionspace.blogspot.com/




      On 2012 Feb 09, at 9:32 AM, RonJeffries wrote:

      > Hi Curtis, and all,
      >
      > On Feb 9, 2012, at 12:06 PM, Curtis Cooley wrote:
      >
      > > As an introvert I'm a little offended by this line of thinking. I feel like
      > > I'm getting labeled as some sort of special needs person who can't function
      > > normally in society. I can adapt fine without "losing a little of who I am"
      > > thank you very much.
      >
      > I kind of share that feeling but I freely grant I am an old white guy who has had every advantage. That said, I am very introverted (though less so in my aging years, as either my brain fails or as I learn more capabilities). After a day of class, or even hanging out at a conference, I want nothing more than to go back to my room and immerse in something non-threatening, like email or a book.
      >
      > And I still haven't the least idea how to meet people, or chat very well at a party. And I have never had a clue on getting to know attractive women and hanging out with them. Every girlfriend I've ever had basically had to kick my feet out from under me.
      >
      > So I am an absolute classic nerd and always have been. I learned to speak in front of groups because I needed to. I took courses in it, including the wonderful Dale Carnegie course, which is of course why I am so smooth and sophisticated today.
      >
      > And yet I've done rather well in the technical world.
      >
      > That said, I am sure that had I been born a shy black girl in the ghetto, it might have gone differently. One never knows.
      >
      > Still, I share with you the feeling that introverts are being almost looked down upon as somehow disabled when I read things like that.
      > >
      > > I'm sure there are people more introverted than I who may find it more
      > > difficult to function in a team room. Perhaps they shouldn't be programmers
      > > just like people who can't grok math shouldn't be programmers.
      >
      > I knew a guy whom I diagnosed as agoraphobic. He couldn't stand being in an open area very long. Darn good programmer, and I hope he found a good job somewhere. He was not a fit for a team-room team, but that doesn't mean he wasn't a perfectly good human being, perfectly capable of helping some company somewhere.
      >
      > In the end, though, I'm sure I just don't get it. I'm just some kind of introverted insensitive b*st*rd, I suppose.
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > Before you contradict an old man, my fair friend, you should endeavor to understand him. - George Santayana
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
    • Adam Sroka
      Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers they see as
      Message 68 of 68 , Mar 19, 2012
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        Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers
        they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers
        they see as timid and geeky and since reviews are subjective anyway this
        bias tends to show up?

        That may sound a bit stereotypical, but as an extroverted programmer it's
        roughly how I feel about it with my own peers. I work hard to give the
        geeky guys equal time, but I definitely like the ones who are more like me
        better whether I want to admit it or not. Some of my best friends are
        managers.

        On Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 12:01 PM, Niels Krijger <niels@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed the
        > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > for the developer role).
        > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of what
        > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > but didn't prove significant.
        > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the manager
        > role it is not of major importance.
        >
        > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        >
        > Regards,
        > Niels
        >
        > 2012/3/19 Niels Krijger <niels.krijger@...>
        >
        > > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed
        > the
        > > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > > for the developer role).
        > > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of
        > what
        > > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > > but didn't prove significant.
        > > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the
        > manager
        > > role it is not of major importance.
        > >
        > > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Niels
        > >
        > >
        > > 2012/3/19 Curtis Cooley <curtis@...>
        > >
        > >> **
        >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 4:24 PM, Curtis Cooley <
        > curtis@...
        > >> >wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM, Acaz Souza Pereira <
        > >> acazsouza@...>wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> >> Pair Programming Considered Harmful?
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/03/pair-programming-considered-harmful/
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Nothing ground breaking here. Executive Summary:
        > >> >
        > >> > Each team needs to find a mix of solo, pairing, and group programming
        > >> that
        > >> > meets the needs of the team and project. And, by the way, it's
        > different
        > >> > for every team.
        > >> >
        > >> > No surprises here ;)
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >> After thinking about this, the whole article is pretty much non
        > sequitor.
        > >> It's based on the premise that creativity is the most important quality
        > of
        > >> a developer when building software, yet provide no evidence or arguments
        > >> to
        > >> prove that is the case. I assert it's not top priority, which is why
        > pair
        > >> programming works. If all it took was creativity, then I would agree
        > that
        > >> PP is harmful, but it doesn't, it takes more, much more, so it's not.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> --
        > >> --------------------------------------
        > >> Curtis Cooley
        > >> curtis@...
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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