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Re: [XP] Introverts, Agile and Creativity

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  • Acaz Souza Pereira
    Hi George, I understand when you say when the difference is in /how/ to do. Really, this is very concerning. In Agile teams that work in room without walls
    Message 1 of 68 , Feb 8, 2012
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      Hi George,

      I understand when you say when the difference is in /how/ to do.
      Really, this is very concerning.
      In Agile teams that work in room without walls with great communication and
      interaction there may
      be less creative, but you gain in productivity. Like Steven say: "Agile is
      R&D" and we need to know
      when to use alone-time and group-time.

      But I believe that most agile teams around the world believe that
      brainstorms are unique and the best
      way to generate good ideas. What is not true.

      2012/2/7 George Dinwiddie <lists@...>

      > **
      >
      >
      > Acaz
      >
      >
      > On 2/7/12 11:50 AM, Acaz Souza Pereira wrote:
      > > Hi,
      > >
      > > recently came out studies on introverts and creativity and I do not know
      > if
      > > the community is knowing:
      > >
      > > The Power of Introverts: A Manifesto for Quiet Brilliance: Scientific
      > > American<
      > http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-power-of-introverts>
      >
      > >
      > > The Rise of the New Groupthink -
      > > NYTimes.com<
      > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/15/opinion/sunday/the-rise-of-the-new-groupthink.html
      > >
      >
      > You'll note that both of these articles are plugging Susan Cain's new
      > book. She's also, apparently, in Time Magazine.
      >
      > You might read
      >
      > http://bobsutton.typepad.com/my_weblog/2012/01/why-the-sharp-distinction-between-individual-and-group-brainstorming-is-false-in-real-teams.html
      > for some balance.
      >
      >
      > > Agile deal a lot with people, collaboration and interaction. I'd like to
      > > start a discussion in this direction.
      >
      > I know from experience (and I'm an introvert) that I do my best work
      > when I balance alone-time and group-time. There's a world that needs
      > exploring and describing in how to do that. What the world /doesn't/
      > need is another book pitting the extremes against each other.
      >
      >
      > > How the community has responded, tried and tested to these researches?
      >
      > I don't think (from reading the articles) that this book is based on
      > research. I think it's based on cherry-picking quotes.
      >
      >
      > > Activities such as pair programming brings loss of creativity?
      >
      > Not in my experience. No more than it does in brainstorming. It's in
      > /how/ you do it.
      >
      > - George
      >
      > --
      > ----------------------------------------------------------
      > * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      > Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      > Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      > ----------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      >



      --
      *[Acaz Souza Pereira]*

      *MSN/GTalk:* acazsouza@...
      *Skype:* acazsouza
      *Cel:* (31) 8706-4103

      twitter.com/acazsouza

      acazsouza.com.br


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Adam Sroka
      Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers they see as
      Message 68 of 68 , Mar 19, 2012
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        Or could it just be that managers tend to favor extroverted programmers
        they see as someone they can have a beer with over introverted programmers
        they see as timid and geeky and since reviews are subjective anyway this
        bias tends to show up?

        That may sound a bit stereotypical, but as an extroverted programmer it's
        roughly how I feel about it with my own peers. I work hard to give the
        geeky guys equal time, but I definitely like the ones who are more like me
        better whether I want to admit it or not. Some of my best friends are
        managers.

        On Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 12:01 PM, Niels Krijger <niels@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed the
        > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > for the developer role).
        > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of what
        > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > but didn't prove significant.
        > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the manager
        > role it is not of major importance.
        >
        > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        >
        > Regards,
        > Niels
        >
        > 2012/3/19 Niels Krijger <niels.krijger@...>
        >
        > > I remember reading an article from I think an IEEE journal that showed
        > the
        > > Extrovert-Introvert dimension was significant on the dependent variable
        > > "Manager-rated performance" for the *developer* role (if I recall
        > > correctly the introvert-extrovert dimension was the only significant one
        > > for the developer role).
        > > The article's rationale was a developer is often the central actor within
        > > the development process and should be able to hold one's own. Much of
        > what
        > > a developer does has consequences, the ability to voice concerns early is
        > > of great value to the Manager. I recall creativity was also in the survey
        > > but didn't prove significant.
        > > The introvert-extrovert dimension wasn't significant for the Manager role
        > > which would support some claims in this discussion at least for the
        > manager
        > > role it is not of major importance.
        > >
        > > I've desperately been looking for the article in question but failed
        > > miserably (I didn't use it in my work afterwards).
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Niels
        > >
        > >
        > > 2012/3/19 Curtis Cooley <curtis@...>
        > >
        > >> **
        >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> On Tue, Mar 6, 2012 at 4:24 PM, Curtis Cooley <
        > curtis@...
        > >> >wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM, Acaz Souza Pereira <
        > >> acazsouza@...>wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> >> Pair Programming Considered Harmful?
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/03/pair-programming-considered-harmful/
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Nothing ground breaking here. Executive Summary:
        > >> >
        > >> > Each team needs to find a mix of solo, pairing, and group programming
        > >> that
        > >> > meets the needs of the team and project. And, by the way, it's
        > different
        > >> > for every team.
        > >> >
        > >> > No surprises here ;)
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >> After thinking about this, the whole article is pretty much non
        > sequitor.
        > >> It's based on the premise that creativity is the most important quality
        > of
        > >> a developer when building software, yet provide no evidence or arguments
        > >> to
        > >> prove that is the case. I assert it's not top priority, which is why
        > pair
        > >> programming works. If all it took was creativity, then I would agree
        > that
        > >> PP is harmful, but it doesn't, it takes more, much more, so it's not.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> --
        > >> --------------------------------------
        > >> Curtis Cooley
        > >> curtis@...
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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