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Re: [XP] XP exception rules

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  • Curtis Cooley
    I know Ron Jeffries has a bunch of ways to introduce pair programming and to keep it from becoming a coder and a watcher/sleeper . Check
    Message 1 of 27 , Oct 18, 2011
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      I know Ron Jeffries has a bunch of ways to introduce pair programming and to
      keep it from becoming a "coder and a watcher/sleeper". Check
      http://xprogramming.com

      On Sat, Oct 15, 2011 at 7:09 PM, JeffGrigg <jeffreytoddgrigg@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > --- "nicolaslochet" <lochetnicolas@...> wrote:
      > > As I was saying to Jeffrey I believe it can be humanly
      > > difficult in the case of pair-programming.
      > > From you experience are people happy with it once tried?
      > > Is there any tricks to get people willing to do it?
      >
      > There are quite a few "tricks" one can use as a coach, or leader, or peer,
      > to help the team or individual members adopt or improve practices.
      >
      > One way to get someone to try "pairing" is to ask them to help you on a
      > problem you're having (without telling them that you're "pair programming"
      > with them).
      >
      > Another is to get people to try pair programming (or anything else) as an
      > experiment, for a limited time, to see if it works for them.
      >
      > [You can't prepare, in advance, for every possible thing that could happen.
      > It's best to read up, become familiar with the practices, and then go do it.
      > You'll probably hit unexpected problems. Get creative. Ask your team members
      > to help you solve the problems. And you can always ask more questions on
      > this list. So don't wait: Do it now.]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Curtis Cooley
      curtis.cooley@...
      blog:http://ponderingobjectorienteddesign.blogspot.com
      ===============
      Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you
      must be without one, be without the strategy.
      -- H. Norman Schwarzkopf


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • George Paci
      ... Or, as I put it: By-the-book XP is like an off-the-rack suit: it s not likely to fit you perfectly, but you d better try it on before you make alterations.
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 13, 2011
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        On 10/10/11 8:49 PM, Charlie Poole wrote:
        > Be cautious about not trying XP as whole-heartedly as possible. There are
        > interactions among the practices that are not obvious to the newcomer. You
        > can and should adapt XP, but only after you are doing it. Don't try to
        > figure out what will or won't work for you before you start.

        Or, as I put it:

        By-the-book XP is like an off-the-rack suit: it's not likely to fit
        you perfectly, but you'd better try it on before you make alterations.


        --George gpaci at tiac dot net

        When you're walking, if one foot gets too far in front of the
        other, it's really painful. Same thing for tests and code.
      • phlipcpp
        ... Get a 3-minute sand timer, and swap keyboarding each time it runs out. If the junior can t switch to driving, the senior literally instructs individual
        Message 3 of 27 , Dec 30, 2011
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          Curtis Cooley <curtis.cooley@...> wrote:

          > I know Ron Jeffries has a bunch of ways to introduce pair programming and to
          > keep it from becoming a "coder and a watcher/sleeper".

          Get a 3-minute sand timer, and swap keyboarding each time it runs out.

          If the junior can't switch to driving, the senior literally instructs individual keystrokes. This inspires the senior to keep the current goals as clear and shared as possible.
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