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Re: [XP] Metaphors Required: Sustainable Pace (and other practices) and Startups

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  • Kay
    And to respond to my own post: Great quote from Chad Fowler s _The Passionate Programmer_: So, I learned from this that people can significantly improve or
    Message 1 of 20 , May 20, 2011
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      And to respond to my own post:

      Great quote from Chad Fowler's _The Passionate Programmer_: "So, I learned from this that people can significantly improve or regress
      in skill, purely based on who they are performing with. And, prolonged
      experience with a group can have a lasting impact on one's
      ability to perform."

      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Kay" <tranzpupy@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi, Steve,
      >
      > Failing frequently, which happens when one is tired and not doing one's best, as in the case of having to produce less than quality work can build up to a consciousness of failure. This can reduce effectiveness not only in the present but into the future if it is not corrected.
      >
      > Success builds on success. Another reason for sustainable pace.
      >
      > Kay Pentecost
      >
      > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@> wrote:
      > >
      > > A couple of useful metaphors where it is well know that being greedy is
      > > counterproductive:
      > >
      > > * Server utilization - it is well known that letting utilization go above
      > > 80% increases wait time, yet one would naively think that getting more work
      > > out of the servers would make the work go faster.
      > >
      > > * Freeway entrance ramp meters - those traffic lights at the ends of freeway
      > > entrance ramps increase effective freeway capacity during rush hours even
      > > though they reduce the number of vehicles using the freeway at any given
      > > time.
      > >
      > > Of course, the real reason is that software development is knowledge work,
      > > not rote labor. Tire people make mistakes that will later cost more time
      > > than was saved. Just redoing the work is usually not enough. Not only is
      > > there the additional work of detecting and finding the erroneous work, but
      > > other work based on that erroneous work may also have to be redone.
      > >
      > > SteveG
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Thu, Apr 7, 2011 at 11:54 AM, Peter Bell <lists@> wrote:
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I'm finding myself doing an increasing amount of consulting with early
      > > > stage start ups. Often the tech teams are either inexperienced or I'm
      > > > actually tasked with some part of the recruiting process to build a team
      > > > around some code I've delivered for the client.
      > > >
      > > > One of the challenge I run into with the people starting businesses is that
      > > > they don't know much about best practices for managing software teams (why
      > > > would they - that's one of the reasons they bring me in).
      > > >
      > > > My question relates primarily to sustainable pace. Strangely enough I'm not
      > > > having a hard time selling (some) pairing. I have no issue selling TDD or
      > > > building some time into each story to do refactoring. I get a lot of
      > > > pushback initially on not interrupting scrums, but once we get into a
      > > > process and get the management educated that goes away.
      > > >
      > > > What I *am* getting push back on is the idea of sustainable pace. Idea X,
      > > > after all, is the one true idea that will change the world. The founder has
      > > > decided to give up sleep until 2015 to build the next big thing. They're
      > > > paying (what seems to them like) crazy salaries for Rails developers with
      > > > experience, and they want to get everything they can out of their
      > > > investment.
      > > >
      > > > There is both the fallacy of "if only we pushed them harder they'd deliver
      > > > more" and the "if only they stayed 16 hours a day we'd be done in half the
      > > > time". I'm looking for metaphors, research, suggestions, blog postings,
      > > > whatever that supports the idea of sustainable pace in the early days of a
      > > > start-up. Much of what I use elsewhere gets countered with the "yeah, but
      > > > they are established so they can afford to take a little longer".
      > > >
      > > > Any thoughts or suggestions much appreciated.
      > > >
      > > > Best Wishes,
      > > > Peter
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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