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Re: [XP] Principles vs Practices: here we go again

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  • Adam Sroka
    ... Yes. The only caveat I would add is that I often see teams try to avoid things that appear difficult even if they recognize the potential value. So, you
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 28 10:45 AM
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      On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 10:26 AM, Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > My experience agrees with yours.
      >
      > I was quibbling with the word discover, which I read as equivalent to
      > invent.
      >
      > Teams should easily be able to find articles on the internet that make the
      > case that TDD addresses the exact problems they are experiencing. Learning
      > to do TDD effectively is indeed quite a different story than learning that
      > it exists and appears useful.
      >

      Yes. The only caveat I would add is that I often see teams try to
      avoid things that appear difficult even if they recognize the
      potential value. So, you end up with some variation of "TDD is great,
      but it won't work here, because..." And it becomes clear (usually
      quickly) that someone saw it as a good idea and someone else nipped it
      in the bud because it appeared too hard. There is a lot of work
      involved in doing something like TDD. You can introduce the basic
      Scrum framework in a few days, but actually doing TDD well takes
      months of practice (at least.)

      Going back to my martial arts analogy, effective techniques aren't
      "discovered" because there is a lot of physical training involved.
      People will stick to what is familiar to them. They will synthesize by
      combining things that they already know in innovative ways, but it is
      rare to see something new. Usually you need someone who knows what
      they are doing to walk you through it several times. Then you need to
      practice it *a lot*. Only then is there much of a chance that you'll
      be able to use it.

      There is an emotional element involved as well (in both disciplines.)
      What people think will work for them is largely driven by their
      individual identity. You don't /really/ find out what works for you
      until you test it (e.g. in the ring, or by creating working software
      with it.) That can be a very sobering experience, because sometimes
      you find out that you suck at the things you thought you were good at,
      and you need to improve in ways that weren't even on your radar.
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