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High-fidelity Visualization – an Agile accelerator?

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  • MarvinToll.com
    Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy for `executable requirements gathering and verification? How is that working out?
    Message 1 of 20 , Jan 30, 2011
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      Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that working out?
    • William Pietri
      ... You re talking pixel-perfect mockups? I think it depends on the circumstance. They re necessary for user testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 31, 2011
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        On 01/30/2011 10:22 AM, MarvinToll.com wrote:
        > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that working out?

        You're talking pixel-perfect mockups?

        I think it depends on the circumstance. They're necessary for user
        testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated stakeholders. However,
        they're expensive to create and hard to change, so they work against the
        Agile grain.

        The teams I saw doing best with this tended to do mostly low-fi mockups
        (e.g., whiteboard sketches, Balsamiq), with a high-fidelity page or two
        as a style guide when that was necessary. If they had to user-test
        something, they might create more high-fidelity mockups, but those were
        treated as disposable assets, rather than things that got updated over
        time. I also see some teams who do mockups directly in HTML and CSS,
        which can be less wasteful.

        In XP-speak, I'd say that most uses of them violate DTSTTCPW. They add
        inertia to the system, and I'd therefore generally call them an Agile
        decelerator.

        William


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jonathan Harley
        IMO, high-fidelity mockups tend to imply completeness to users. One ends up having to justify why the estimates to complete the actual work are so large ,
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 1, 2011
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          IMO, high-fidelity mockups tend to imply completeness to users. One ends up
          having to justify why the estimates to complete the actual work are so
          'large', after all they saw it nearly complete..

          On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 4:45 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > On 01/30/2011 10:22 AM, MarvinToll.com wrote:
          > > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy
          > for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that
          > working out?
          >
          > You're talking pixel-perfect mockups?
          >
          > I think it depends on the circumstance. They're necessary for user
          > testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated stakeholders. However,
          > they're expensive to create and hard to change, so they work against the
          > Agile grain.
          >
          > The teams I saw doing best with this tended to do mostly low-fi mockups
          > (e.g., whiteboard sketches, Balsamiq), with a high-fidelity page or two
          > as a style guide when that was necessary. If they had to user-test
          > something, they might create more high-fidelity mockups, but those were
          > treated as disposable assets, rather than things that got updated over
          > time. I also see some teams who do mockups directly in HTML and CSS,
          > which can be less wasteful.
          >
          > In XP-speak, I'd say that most uses of them violate DTSTTCPW. They add
          > inertia to the system, and I'd therefore generally call them an Agile
          > decelerator.
          >
          > William
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Steven Gordon
          They also imply a finality that suggests that the design has already been decided. This inhibits feedback. Low-fidelity mockups tend to encourage
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 1, 2011
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            They also imply a finality that suggests that the design has already
            been decided. This inhibits feedback.

            Low-fidelity mockups tend to encourage brainstorming and feedback.

            On Tue, Feb 1, 2011 at 9:23 AM, Jonathan Harley <jdharley@...> wrote:
            > IMO, high-fidelity mockups tend to imply completeness to users.  One ends up
            > having to justify why the estimates to complete the actual work are so
            > 'large', after all they saw it nearly complete..
            >
            > On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 4:45 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
            >
            >>
            >>
            >> On 01/30/2011 10:22 AM, MarvinToll.com wrote:
            >> > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy
            >> for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that
            >> working out?
            >>
            >> You're talking pixel-perfect mockups?
            >>
            >> I think it depends on the circumstance. They're necessary for user
            >> testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated stakeholders. However,
            >> they're expensive to create and hard to change, so they work against the
            >> Agile grain.
            >>
            >> The teams I saw doing best with this tended to do mostly low-fi mockups
            >> (e.g., whiteboard sketches, Balsamiq), with a high-fidelity page or two
            >> as a style guide when that was necessary. If they had to user-test
            >> something, they might create more high-fidelity mockups, but those were
            >> treated as disposable assets, rather than things that got updated over
            >> time. I also see some teams who do mockups directly in HTML and CSS,
            >> which can be less wasteful.
            >>
            >> In XP-speak, I'd say that most uses of them violate DTSTTCPW. They add
            >> inertia to the system, and I'd therefore generally call them an Agile
            >> decelerator.
            >>
            >> William
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to:   extremeprogramming@...
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
            >
            > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Charlie Poole
            I agree with this and also with William s post. But I m still not sure if such mockups are what Marvin was asking about. Marvin? Charlie
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 1, 2011
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              I agree with this and also with William's post. But I'm still not sure if such
              mockups are what Marvin was asking about. Marvin?

              Charlie

              On Tue, Feb 1, 2011 at 8:23 AM, Jonathan Harley <jdharley@...> wrote:
              > IMO, high-fidelity mockups tend to imply completeness to users.  One ends up
              > having to justify why the estimates to complete the actual work are so
              > 'large', after all they saw it nearly complete..
              >
              > On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 4:45 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> On 01/30/2011 10:22 AM, MarvinToll.com wrote:
              >> > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy
              >> for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that
              >> working out?
              >>
              >> You're talking pixel-perfect mockups?
              >>
              >> I think it depends on the circumstance. They're necessary for user
              >> testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated stakeholders. However,
              >> they're expensive to create and hard to change, so they work against the
              >> Agile grain.
              >>
              >> The teams I saw doing best with this tended to do mostly low-fi mockups
              >> (e.g., whiteboard sketches, Balsamiq), with a high-fidelity page or two
              >> as a style guide when that was necessary. If they had to user-test
              >> something, they might create more high-fidelity mockups, but those were
              >> treated as disposable assets, rather than things that got updated over
              >> time. I also see some teams who do mockups directly in HTML and CSS,
              >> which can be less wasteful.
              >>
              >> In XP-speak, I'd say that most uses of them violate DTSTTCPW. They add
              >> inertia to the system, and I'd therefore generally call them an Agile
              >> decelerator.
              >>
              >> William
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to:   extremeprogramming@...
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
              >
              > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • George Dinwiddie
              ... If that s what s meant, I ve also seen them drive the costs way up as developers try to match the pixels for all browser/platform combinations. I ve seen
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 1, 2011
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                On 1/31/11 4:45 PM, William Pietri wrote:
                > On 01/30/2011 10:22 AM, MarvinToll.com wrote:
                >> Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that working out?
                >
                > You're talking pixel-perfect mockups?
                >
                > I think it depends on the circumstance. They're necessary for user
                > testing or getting feedback from unsophisticated stakeholders. However,
                > they're expensive to create and hard to change, so they work against the
                > Agile grain.

                If that's what's meant, I've also seen them drive the costs way up as
                developers try to match the pixels for all browser/platform
                combinations. I've seen much more Agile (and cost-effective) approaches
                where the developers know the intent of the design, and can allow for
                some pixel variations between browsers (especially IE6) in discussion
                with the designer/UX expert/Product Owner.

                - George

                --
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
              • MarvinToll.com
                Turns out many weren t entirely sure what was meant by High-fidelity Visualization . I previously thought that `pixel perfect visualizations were a waste of
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                  Turns out many weren't entirely sure what was meant by "High-fidelity Visualization". I previously thought that `pixel perfect' visualizations were a waste of time – that was before becoming a customer for a Mobile Application.

                  We wanted to engage scores of stakeholders in contributing to a Mobile Application – to mature a first-draft concept. We are publicly sharing our approach. See if you think this approach using "High-fidelity Visualization" makes a positive contribution to `executable requirements'.

                  http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm


                  --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that working out?
                  >
                • Jonathan Harley
                  Too bad the link downloads 53MB of incompatible reader... To take a look you ll have to register and download the correct reader at:
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                    Too bad the link downloads 53MB of incompatible reader... To take a look
                    you'll have to register and download the correct reader at:
                    https://irise-evaluation.subscribenet.com/control/irie/registration_irie?origsource=iRise%20Reader%20from%20Product%20Page
                    <https://irise-evaluation.subscribenet.com/control/irie/registration_irie?origsource=iRise%20Reader%20from%20Product%20Page>

                    On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 8:05 AM, MarvinToll.com <MarvinToll@...>wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > Turns out many weren't entirely sure what was meant by "High-fidelity
                    > Visualization". I previously thought that `pixel perfect' visualizations
                    > were a waste of time � that was before becoming a customer for a Mobile
                    > Application.
                    >
                    > We wanted to engage scores of stakeholders in contributing to a Mobile
                    > Application � to mature a first-draft concept. We are publicly sharing our
                    > approach. See if you think this approach using "High-fidelity Visualization"
                    > makes a positive contribution to `executable requirements'.
                    >
                    > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                    >
                    > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                    > "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Is anyone a practitioner with high-fidelity visualizations as a strategy
                    > for `executable requirements' gathering and verification? How is that
                    > working out?
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Tim Ottinger
                    Marvin: So far all I know about you is our disagreements. It s time to fix that. What can I read that will help me to understand your context, intent,
                    Message 9 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                      Marvin:

                      So far all I know about you is our disagreements. It's time to fix that. What
                      can I read that will

                      help me to understand your context, intent, background so that you don't become
                      "that guy
                      on the other side of the argument?"

                      My blogs are below my name.

                      Tim Ottinger

                      http://agileinaflash.blogspot.com/
                      http://agileotter.blogspot.com/
                      http://tottinge.blogsome.com/
                    • Curtis Cooley
                      ... Looks like there s room for more executable requirements . [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                        On Feb 3, 2011 5:28 AM, "Jonathan Harley" <jdharley@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Too bad the link downloads 53MB of incompatible reader...

                        Looks like there's room for more 'executable requirements'.


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • MarvinToll.com
                        The version incompatibility problem has been resolved with an update to instructions at: http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                        Message 11 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                          The version incompatibility problem has been resolved with an update to instructions at:

                          http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm

                          --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Jonathan Harley <jdharley@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Too bad the link downloads 53MB of incompatible reader...
                        • MarvinToll.com
                          Wow Tim... a piece of my vision is at http://soaj.info - my fourth open source project Motto: foresight to imagine big... insight to tweak small ( at
                          Message 12 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                            Wow Tim... a piece of my vision is at http://soaj.info - my fourth open source project

                            Motto: "foresight to imagine big... insight to tweak small"
                            ( at http://gtcgroup.com )

                            And right now I'm swamped with our second annual Agile and Beyond Conference! Talk to you after March 12th! :-)

                            --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Tim Ottinger <linux_tim@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Marvin:
                            >
                            > So far all I know about you is our disagreements. It's time to fix that. What
                            > can I read that will
                            >
                            > help me to understand your context, intent, background so that you don't become
                            > "that guy
                            > on the other side of the argument?"
                            >
                            > My blogs are below my name.
                            >
                            > Tim Ottinger
                            >
                            > http://agileinaflash.blogspot.com/
                            > http://agileotter.blogspot.com/
                            > http://tottinge.blogsome.com/
                            >
                          • Tim Ottinger
                            I wanted to converse on the principles in http://gtcgroup.com/agile/index.html but it is an image, and not text at all. It is not easy to cut-and-paste
                            Message 13 of 20 , Feb 3, 2011
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                              I wanted to converse on the principles in http://gtcgroup.com/agile/index.html
                              but it is an image, and not text at all. It is not easy to cut-and-paste
                              meaningfully.
                              I'll catch you in email sometime.

                              Tim Ottinger
                              http://agileinaflash.blogspot.com/
                              http://agileotter.blogspot.com/



                              ----- Original Message ----
                              > From: Tim Ottinger <linux_tim@...>
                              > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Thu, February 3, 2011 8:54:17 AM
                              > Subject: Re: [XP] Re: High-fidelity Visualization – an Agile accelerator?
                              >
                              > Marvin:
                              >
                              > So far all I know about you is our disagreements. It's time to fix that. What

                              > can I read that will
                              >
                              > help me to understand your context, intent, background so that you don't
                              >become
                              >
                              > "that guy
                              > on the other side of the argument?"
                              >
                              > My blogs are below my name.
                              >
                              > Tim Ottinger
                              >
                              > http://agileinaflash.blogspot.com/
                              > http://agileotter.blogspot.com/
                              > http://tottinge.blogsome.com/
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------
                              >
                              > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
                              >
                              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                              >extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
                              >
                              > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • Carlo Bottiglieri
                              Hello, I browsed through the 4MB presentation but I could not watch the youtube video. Two questions : 1) Is this maybe related to MDA? Or OSGi? 2) Among the
                              Message 14 of 20 , Feb 4, 2011
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                                Hello,

                                I browsed through the 4MB presentation but I could not watch the youtube
                                video. Two questions :
                                1) Is this maybe related to MDA? Or OSGi?
                                2) Among the "available technical roles", what's a "TDD Specialist"?

                                In fact I got a third question :
                                Can you explain me how "Automated Method Testing" will let me "be advantaged
                                by Test Driven Development (TDD) techniques with cost-sensitivity"? I'm not
                                sure I understand the link between AMT (Automated Method Testing), TDD and
                                "cost-sensitivity".

                                Carlo

                                On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 11:46 PM, MarvinToll.com <MarvinToll@...>wrote:

                                >
                                >
                                > Wow Tim... a piece of my vision is at http://soaj.info - my fourth open
                                > source project
                                >
                                > Motto: "foresight to imagine big... insight to tweak small"
                                > ( at http://gtcgroup.com )
                                >
                                > And right now I'm swamped with our second annual Agile and Beyond
                                > Conference! Talk to you after March 12th! :-)
                                >
                                > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>,
                                > Tim Ottinger <linux_tim@...> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Marvin:
                                > >
                                > > So far all I know about you is our disagreements. It's time to fix that.
                                > What
                                > > can I read that will
                                > >
                                > > help me to understand your context, intent, background so that you don't
                                > become
                                > > "that guy
                                > > on the other side of the argument?"
                                > >
                                > > My blogs are below my name.
                                > >
                                > > Tim Ottinger
                                > >
                                > > http://agileinaflash.blogspot.com/
                                > > http://agileotter.blogspot.com/
                                > > http://tottinge.blogsome.com/
                                > >
                                >
                                >
                                >


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • MarvinToll.com
                                We are only 25% into into our grand 4-day experiment of engaging a large stakeholder community for the purpose of feedback for a Mobile Application.
                                Message 15 of 20 , Feb 4, 2011
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                                  We are only 25% into into our grand 4-day experiment of engaging a large stakeholder community for the purpose of feedback for a Mobile Application. Thirty-five of us met for an hour and ten minutes today to begin formulating our learning. So far - the talk centered around the decomposition of the term "Fidelity" as follows:

                                  Visualization Concerns:
                                  a. Fidelity of Navigation (between pages)
                                  b. Fidelity of Interaction (within a page)
                                  c. Fidelity of Data (sample vs. contextualized)
                                  d. Fidelity of Rendered Page (hand drawn vs. pixel perfect)
                                  e. Fidelity of Business Rule (i.e. You can only attend one Conference session at the time.)
                                  f. Fidelity of failure modes

                                  Two Principles have tentatively emerged:

                                  1. The analysis of the usefulness of this type of tool is nuanced and project specific.

                                  2. It makes a difference if it is Mobile Application:

                                  a. Form factor matters.
                                  b. The mobile community tends to be impatient and intolerant of poor usability... perhaps more so than a web application.

                                  ... More to come ...

                                  --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > We want to engage scores of stakeholders in contributing to a Mobile Application – to mature a first-draft concept. We are publicly sharing our approach. See if you think this approach using "High-fidelity Visualization" makes a positive contribution to `executable requirements'.
                                  >
                                  > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                                • marty.nelson
                                  Marvin - One suggestion would be to focus on those features that show satisfaction of desires versus (or before those) that are mechanisms of fulfillment .
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Feb 4, 2011
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                                    Marvin -

                                    One suggestion would be to focus on those features that show 'satisfaction of desires' versus (or before those) that are 'mechanisms of fulfillment'.

                                    They tend to cost less because they are simpler, they validate high-level concepts (fulfillment mechanisms are /just/ necessary evils), and they precede mechanism requirements so it prevents more costly churn.

                                    --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > We are only 25% into into our grand 4-day experiment of engaging a large stakeholder community for the purpose of feedback for a Mobile Application. Thirty-five of us met for an hour and ten minutes today to begin formulating our learning. So far - the talk centered around the decomposition of the term "Fidelity" as follows:
                                    >
                                    > Visualization Concerns:
                                    > a. Fidelity of Navigation (between pages)
                                    > b. Fidelity of Interaction (within a page)
                                    > c. Fidelity of Data (sample vs. contextualized)
                                    > d. Fidelity of Rendered Page (hand drawn vs. pixel perfect)
                                    > e. Fidelity of Business Rule (i.e. You can only attend one Conference session at the time.)
                                    > f. Fidelity of failure modes
                                    >
                                    > Two Principles have tentatively emerged:
                                    >
                                    > 1. The analysis of the usefulness of this type of tool is nuanced and project specific.
                                    >
                                    > 2. It makes a difference if it is Mobile Application:
                                    >
                                    > a. Form factor matters.
                                    > b. The mobile community tends to be impatient and intolerant of poor usability... perhaps more so than a web application.
                                    >
                                    > ... More to come ...
                                    >
                                    > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > We want to engage scores of stakeholders in contributing to a Mobile Application – to mature a first-draft concept. We are publicly sharing our approach. See if you think this approach using "High-fidelity Visualization" makes a positive contribution to `executable requirements'.
                                    > >
                                    > > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                                    >
                                  • MarvinToll.com
                                    @marty - Can you make this concrete for me? In the context of our particular visualization what would constitute satisfaction of desires ? What would
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Feb 6, 2011
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                                      @marty - Can you make this concrete for me?

                                      In the context of our particular visualization what would constitute 'satisfaction of desires'?

                                      What would constitute 'mechanisms of fulfillment'?

                                      http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm

                                      --- "marty.nelson" <noslenytram@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Marvin -
                                      >
                                      > One suggestion would be to focus on those features that show 'satisfaction of desires' versus (or before those) that are 'mechanisms of fulfillment'.
                                      >
                                      > They tend to cost less because they are simpler, they validate high-level concepts (fulfillment mechanisms are /just/ necessary evils), and they precede mechanism requirements so it prevents more costly churn.
                                    • marty.nelson
                                      I think there are clearer examples in the SimBank sample iDoc. The Registration Confirmation page is the satisfaction of desires (How will the system
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                        I think there are clearer examples in the SimBank sample iDoc.
                                        The 'Registration Confirmation' page is the 'satisfaction of desires' (How will the system show/prove that user got what they wanted out of registration?), the Registration page is the 'mechanism of fulfillment' (What user uses to get what they want out of the system).

                                        Of course, there may be other needs unexpressed, for example what does the bank need to see from the system to show them they are getting what they want (desire) out of people registering.

                                        Ticket Confirmation and My Tickets are both 'satisfaction of desires' and Create Ticket is 'mechanism of fulfillment'.

                                        In the Agile and Beyond scheduler app, I would assume that the 'My Sessions' page is the 'satisfaction of desires' and the 'All sessions' with some type of 'choose this one' is the 'mechanism of fulfillment'. If this wasn't the intent of the app, then using this technique explicitly would help clarify the purpose.

                                        Now if this all makes sense to you, one thing you may notice is that the 'satisfaction of desires' feature defines the interface and needs that the 'mechanism of fulfillment' must ultimately provide. What this means is the 'satisfaction of desires' features can be used to test drive 'mechanism of fulfillment' features.

                                        (An unrelated comment, the technologist in me cringes at having to download and install an app to run iRise. The fact that it runs in a browser doesn't help but make me wonder why it wasn't delivered as a pure browser solution. Maybe the writer component? Anyway, just .02 on that one)

                                        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > @marty - Can you make this concrete for me?
                                        >
                                        > In the context of our particular visualization what would constitute 'satisfaction of desires'?
                                        >
                                        > What would constitute 'mechanisms of fulfillment'?
                                        >
                                        > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                                        >
                                        > --- "marty.nelson" <noslenytram@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Marvin -
                                        > >
                                        > > One suggestion would be to focus on those features that show 'satisfaction of desires' versus (or before those) that are 'mechanisms of fulfillment'.
                                        > >
                                        > > They tend to cost less because they are simpler, they validate high-level concepts (fulfillment mechanisms are /just/ necessary evils), and they precede mechanism requirements so it prevents more costly churn.
                                        >
                                      • MarvinToll.com
                                        hmmm... How do these two concepts improve our application? How do we use satisfaction of desires features to test drive mechanism of fulfillment features?
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                          hmmm... How do these two concepts improve our application?

                                          How do we use 'satisfaction of desires' features to test drive 'mechanism of fulfillment' features?

                                          What outcome(s) can we anticipate from this exercise?

                                          (I'm a Java guy and am struggling to catch-on to the concrete value-proposition for our application.)

                                          --- "marty.nelson" <noslenytram@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > In the Agile and Beyond scheduler app, I would assume that the 'My Sessions' page is the 'satisfaction of desires' and the 'All sessions' with some type of 'choose this one' is the 'mechanism of fulfillment'. If this wasn't the intent of the app, then using this technique explicitly would help clarify the purpose.
                                          >
                                          > Now if this all makes sense to you, one thing you may notice is that the 'satisfaction of desires' feature defines the interface and needs that the 'mechanism of fulfillment' must ultimately provide. What this means is the 'satisfaction of desires' features can be used to test drive 'mechanism of fulfillment' features.
                                          >
                                          > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > @marty - Can you make this concrete for me?
                                          > >
                                          > > In the context of our particular visualization what would constitute 'satisfaction of desires'?
                                          > >
                                          > > What would constitute 'mechanisms of fulfillment'?
                                          > >
                                          > > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                                          > >
                                        • marty.nelson
                                          ... Users/Customers care about satisfaction of desires , and tolerate mechanisms of fulfillment in order to get that. So your application improves because
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Feb 11, 2011
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            > hmmm... How do these two concepts improve our application?
                                            Users/Customers care about 'satisfaction of desires', and tolerate 'mechanisms of fulfillment' in order to get that. So your application improves because it a) gives users and customers more of what they explicitly want, and b) only thrusts upon the users the minimal mechanism need to achieve those outcomes.

                                            > How do we use 'satisfaction of desires' features to test drive 'mechanism of fulfillment' features?
                                            > What outcome(s) can we anticipate from this exercise?

                                            While the conversation is about 'satisfaction of desires' is subjective, once agreed upon it implies very specific requirements about what the system needs to provide to support that artifact. This is essentially the output side of an "acceptance test", so you can then define inputs and can create the 'mechanism of fulfillment' in a test first manner

                                            > (I'm a Java guy and am struggling to catch-on to the concrete value-proposition for our application.)

                                            Well another great reasons to have these conversations is that they expose weak or missing 'value-propositions'. For example, is the point of your application so that an attendee would have something to tell them the 'next session'? Is the point to provide a way to learn about sessions? Both? Does a user want to decide everything ahead of time? Or would having something with a 1st, 2nd and 3rd choice for each time slot that allowed JIT decisions be better? What does the organizer need to be shown to know this system is providing value? Are they hoping to do some planning or room balancing based on expected attendance? Is this meant to be a vote sessions up or down kind of thing?

                                            The point being, any investment in 'mechanisms of fulfillment' are dubious if we don't know what the various constituents hope to get out of the application ('satisfaction of desires').


                                            > --- "marty.nelson" <noslenytram@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > In the Agile and Beyond scheduler app, I would assume that the 'My Sessions' page is the 'satisfaction of desires' and the 'All sessions' with some type of 'choose this one' is the 'mechanism of fulfillment'. If this wasn't the intent of the app, then using this technique explicitly would help clarify the purpose.
                                            > >
                                            > > Now if this all makes sense to you, one thing you may notice is that the 'satisfaction of desires' feature defines the interface and needs that the 'mechanism of fulfillment' must ultimately provide. What this means is the 'satisfaction of desires' features can be used to test drive 'mechanism of fulfillment' features.
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "MarvinToll.com" <MarvinToll@> wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > @marty - Can you make this concrete for me?
                                            > > >
                                            > > > In the context of our particular visualization what would constitute 'satisfaction of desires'?
                                            > > >
                                            > > > What would constitute 'mechanisms of fulfillment'?
                                            > > >
                                            > > > http://tinyurl.com/45qcfkm
                                            > > >
                                            >
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