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Re: New Agile Vehicles

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  • Kripanidhi
    I had to pick Joshua s point of discussion from his original post to justify it. There are many reasons why his point that we need a newer Agile Vehicles to
    Message 1 of 216 , Dec 2, 2010
      I had to pick Joshua's point of discussion from his original post to justify it.

      There are many reasons why his point that we need a newer Agile Vehicles to enable organizations migrate to these paradigms more effectively, is fully valid.

      I have had similar experiences when trying to help larger organizations transition to Agile. I had found that the primary lacunae that surfaces first in the teams is their inability to build software in the incremental and iterative mode using the right engineering practices like Incremental Architecture, Evolving Design, TDD, Continuous Integration, Automated Testing and Continous Refactoring.

      This has nothing to do with Agile, but is a core prerequisite competency to get into the IID mode of software development that agile methodologies mandate.

      Here is the sequential road-map that worked for me with many large customers helping them migrate to Agile:

      First Destination for the Agile Vehicle:

      Get teams build competencies in IID Engineering Practices as mentioned above. That's exactly what Joshua's IL albums contribute to. This is the preliminary abintio "Shu" stage competency needed for everyone trying to build software in the IID mode. Their management style can continue to be formal and traditional at this stage.

      Second Destination for the Agile Venhicle:

      Once the IID engineering competency is achieved by the organization, introduce the concepts of Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) to enable them understand how to shrink cycle times and work towards continuous improvements using TOC. Their management style slowly migrates to a systems approach to continuous improvement. Cutter had a few years ago, published my experience report on this.

      Third Destination for the Agile Vehicle:

      The teams now understand how to handle complexities, individual capabilities and unpredictabilities in the way we build software. They also understand the vagaries of estimation and adaptive planning. They are now ready to be introduced to shifting their business focus from focusing on efficiency (costs) to focusing on Value (customer). Introduction to Lean Values and Principles here makes perfect sense and the Lean Engineering Concepts now get integrated into their way of working. Organization now focuses on how to anticipate, understand meet and exceed Customer (user) Value Expectations (and perceptions). Their organizational business policies change for the better.

      Fourth Destination for the Agile Vehicle:

      The organization is now introduced to the concept of Performance Management in the Knowledge Industry. The "Y" Theory for people management. We enable organizations flatten their hierarchies, invert their pyramid structure, restructure their way of working in teams rather than individual roles to finally result in the entire organization working through coordinated and empowered clusters of self-organizing cross functional teams with reward systems promoting collective ownership in teams. This makes the productivity and profitability of the organization visible and tangible.

      Fifth Destination for the Agile Vehicle:

      The organization now is ready for embracing the true Values and Principles of Agile. Their Business Policies now are oriented towards collaboration (not contract). Their Planning and Execution now are oriented towards being Adaptive. Their People are now enjoying working in Teams with collective ownership. They now need to understand how to leverage this further by focusing on Mutual Trust, Transparency in their relationships with their customers and how to actively collaborate with customers iteratively to accelerate co-creation of Value.

      They should now be in their "Ha" stage of learning. Over time, with consistent innovation and improvement, the organizations can now aim to mature to the "Ri" stage.

      This done, to my mind, is Agile Accomplished.

      Kripanidhi
      http://scrumtales.blogspot.com
      http://scrumforwaterfall.blogspot.com









      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Joshua Kerievsky <joshua@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Folks,
      >
      > I read Ron's blog about Scrum the other day:
      > http://xprogramming.com/articles/scrum-is-ok/
      >
      > Ron says:
      >
      > "Alan would prefer that Scrum include more things that people are likely to
      > need. To me, that is like saying that we should redefine the Corvette to
      > have dual rear wheels for better hauling. The Corvette is what it is: deal
      > with it. Scrum is defined as it is, by thoughtful people who have a certain
      > set of assumptions about how things should work. It works pretty well, it
      > has a commanding market share, and it means what it means."
      >
      > Waterfall also had (or has) a "commanding market share."
      >
      > A "commanding market share" is useful for people who have businesses
      > invested in that market.
      >
      > My interest continues to be on finding better, faster pathways to excellence
      > for my company and our clients.
      >
      > When I see repeated flaws like I do in the many teams that adopt Scrum, I
      > cannot simply say "oh well, it's the leading Agile process, so deal with
      > it."
      >
      > Scrum is a 20th century approach to Agility.
      >
      > It's "inspect and adapt" advice is beautiful, only too many teams don't do
      > it, so we encounter way too many teams that have huge technical debt issues.
      >
      > It's the equivalent of pressing the pedal on the Corvette and not getting
      > any acceleration - a fatal flaw.
      >
      > Should we overlook such flaws and just "deal with it"?
      >
      > Fuck no!
      >
      > Let's instead focus on creating newer, better 21st century Agile vehicles.
      >
      > --
      > best,
      > jk
      >
      > --
      > Joshua Kerievsky
      > Founder, CEO
      > Industrial Logic, Inc.
      > Web: http://industriallogic.com
      > Twitter: @JoshuaKerievsky, @IndustrialLogic
      >
      > Amplify Your Agility
      > Coaching | Training | Assessment | eLearning
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Steven Gordon
      On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt ... Alternative interpretation: Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal proof
      Message 216 of 216 , Jan 24, 2011
        On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt
        <d.andre.dhondt@...> wrote:
        > On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 2:08 AM, Amir Kolsky <kolsky@...> wrote:
        >
        >>   And again, one is reminded of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis…
        >>
        >
        > Meaning that people tend to reject new ideas just because they're new?
        > (Semmelweis suggested surgeons should wash hands with chlorine between
        > patients).

        Alternative interpretation:

        Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal
        proof instead of empirical success before accepting new ideas.

        >
        > --
        > D. André Dhondt
        > mobile: 215-805-0819
        > skype: d.andre.dhondt
        > twitter: adhondt   http://dhondtsayitsagile.blogspot.com/
        >
        > Support low-cost conferences -- http://AgileTour.org/
        > If you're in the area, join Agile Philly http://www.AgilePhilly.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
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