Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] Re: New Agile Vehicles

Expand Messages
  • Joshua Kerievsky
    ... Yes, management deserves to have an idea of when software can/will be ready. Several teams we ve coached grouped valuable stories into a release (usually
    Message 1 of 216 , Dec 2, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 4:15 PM, Gary Brown <glbrown@...> wrote:

      > Here is what I know from my context. Upper management wants to know what
      > projects are going to cost and what the expected result is before they
      > approve them. The only way to do that in my context, is to create some
      > kind
      > of high level backlog of ideas and ballpark an estimate. On the
      > Customer/Product Owner side, that can take some effort. On the Developer
      > side, not so much. I would prefer a different process, but our culture
      > isn't there yet. I don't think we are unique on that front. 8^)
      >

      Yes, management deserves to have an idea of when software can/will be ready.


      Several teams we've coached grouped valuable stories into a release (usually
      2-3 months) by doing gut-feel estimates. No numbers were involved. They
      just said "Do we think we can do all these stories?" Of course, even that
      answer is a fantasy, so the trick is to revisit those guesses all along the
      way (e.g. every few weeks) and update the release plan for management. We
      found that management was happy with that (esp. the updates to the plan),
      and it involved no complicated velocity calculations or trying to decide
      what to do about some holiday or how much to change the velocity when three
      people got the flu, etc. In other words, it was just simpler, fewer things
      to think about, yielding as good, if not better results. Less process, more
      focus on value.

      --
      best,
      jk

      --
      Joshua Kerievsky
      Founder, CEO
      Industrial Logic, Inc.
      Web: http://industriallogic.com
      Twitter: @JoshuaKerievsky, @IndustrialLogic

      Amplify Your Agility
      Coaching | Training | Assessment | eLearning


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Steven Gordon
      On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt ... Alternative interpretation: Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal proof
      Message 216 of 216 , Jan 24, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt
        <d.andre.dhondt@...> wrote:
        > On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 2:08 AM, Amir Kolsky <kolsky@...> wrote:
        >
        >>   And again, one is reminded of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis…
        >>
        >
        > Meaning that people tend to reject new ideas just because they're new?
        > (Semmelweis suggested surgeons should wash hands with chlorine between
        > patients).

        Alternative interpretation:

        Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal
        proof instead of empirical success before accepting new ideas.

        >
        > --
        > D. André Dhondt
        > mobile: 215-805-0819
        > skype: d.andre.dhondt
        > twitter: adhondt   http://dhondtsayitsagile.blogspot.com/
        >
        > Support low-cost conferences -- http://AgileTour.org/
        > If you're in the area, join Agile Philly http://www.AgilePhilly.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to:   extremeprogramming@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
        >
        > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.