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Re: [XP] Re: New Agile Vehicles

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  • Joshua Kerievsky
    ... Perhaps we have to distinguish between improvements and innovation. Cars have improved from 100 years ago, yet most of them still don t make it easy to
    Message 1 of 216 , Dec 1, 2010
      On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 5:36 AM, Laurent Bossavit <laurent@...>wrote:

      > Yet, with the rate at which new programming languages spring up, you'd
      > think if the solution was going to come from that area of innovation
      > we would have happened on it by now.
      >

      Perhaps we have to distinguish between improvements and innovation. Cars
      have improved from 100 years ago, yet most of them still don't make it easy
      to parallel park. Are the new languages improvements on old languages or
      real innovations that make software development far easier?


      > Also... This Sunday I tweeted the following:
      >
      > We rarely mention the most basic problem: most programmers are not
      > well educated for the job they do. -- David Parnas
      >
      > Somewhat to my surprise this was retweeted by 40+ people, which I'm
      > interpreting as broad agreement. I'm not sure if that's "blaming folks
      > for being incompetent" but we seem to recognize that part of the issue
      > is with education.
      >

      Great tweet, BTW. I was one of the retweeters. David Parnas rocks. I feel
      fortunate to have met him at the XP200x conferences in Sardinia.


      > Do you find, for instance, that before they can be successful people
      > and teams need to *un*learn some things?
      >

      Yes, I find we constantly need to unlearn things.

      --
      best,
      jk

      --
      Joshua Kerievsky
      Founder, CEO
      Industrial Logic, Inc.
      Web: http://industriallogic.com
      Twitter: @JoshuaKerievsky, @IndustrialLogic

      Amplify Your Agility
      Coaching | Training | Assessment | eLearning


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Steven Gordon
      On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt ... Alternative interpretation: Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal proof
      Message 216 of 216 , Jan 24, 2011
        On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 4:11 AM, D.André Dhondt
        <d.andre.dhondt@...> wrote:
        > On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 2:08 AM, Amir Kolsky <kolsky@...> wrote:
        >
        >>   And again, one is reminded of Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis…
        >>
        >
        > Meaning that people tend to reject new ideas just because they're new?
        > (Semmelweis suggested surgeons should wash hands with chlorine between
        > patients).

        Alternative interpretation:

        Domains that consider themselves scientific tend to require formal
        proof instead of empirical success before accepting new ideas.

        >
        > --
        > D. André Dhondt
        > mobile: 215-805-0819
        > skype: d.andre.dhondt
        > twitter: adhondt   http://dhondtsayitsagile.blogspot.com/
        >
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        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
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