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[XP] Re: Is Kanban Agile?

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  • MarvinToll.com
    On the topic of Responding to Change ... Perhaps I m a bit overly sensitive... but it doesn t seem to me that the endless use of Japanese automakers for
    Message 1 of 232 , Oct 9, 2010
      On the topic of 'Responding to Change'...

      Perhaps I'm a bit overly sensitive... but it doesn't seem to me that the endless use of Japanese automakers for examples of "persuing perfection" are current fact-based.

      From JD Power.. the most "Dependable" brand is the Ford Lincoln nameplate: http://www.jdpower.com/autos/ratings/dependability-ratings-by-brand/

      Compare Ford with Toyota on "Performance and Design": http://www.jdpower.com/autos/ratings/performance-and-design-ratings-by-brand/

      And in the high-end market one sees that the Germans and Japanese both have two brands: http://www.jdpower.com/autos/ratings/quality-ratings-by-brand/

      I understand that 'following a plan' is sometimes easier then 'responding to change'... however, who's plan are we following?

      --- Vic Williams <process.facilitator@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ok, in that way Zen and Japanese culture have a culture of persuing
      > perfection. They have a living craft tradition where the workings, the
      > means, the doings, embody the goal. A Japanese tea garden or a Toyota
      > car factory is tinkered for years towards perfection.
      >
    • paul
      ... Sorry thats a bit of a circular argument - the fact (probability ?) that methods don t deliver actually gives an opportunity for agile to demonstrate
      Message 232 of 232 , Oct 14, 2010
        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Steven Gordon <sgordonphd@...> wrote:

        > It is not like scope and time constraints at such enterprises are really
        > being met now (if so, I say they should not be adopting agile because their
        > current methods are working). So maybe the constraints are invalid.

        Sorry thats a bit of a circular argument - the fact (probability ?) that methods don't deliver actually gives an opportunity for agile to demonstrate superiority.

        >
        > Furthermore, the scope of such projects can be decomposed into smaller
        > projects. Then the coordinating effort becomes one of coordinating
        > projects, not individual developers working on the same large, unwieldy
        > project.

        Indeed, but its coordinating projects where agile is currently weak compared to coordinating individuals. Multiple projects/teams is still better under agile than one massive one - its just that we are still feeling way somewhere when applying agile at this scale.

        Paul.
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