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Re: [XP] Finding Happiness in Agile (was Re: "Agile" ...)

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  • Adam Sroka
    In my experience teams that are successful and are following an Agile methodology seem to be happier than other teams. That is only my impression though, and
    Message 1 of 96 , Sep 20, 2010
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      In my experience teams that are successful and are following an Agile
      methodology seem to be happier than other teams. That is only my impression
      though, and seems like it would be nearly impossible to quantify (Although,
      I have seen survey results that support the notion.)

      Agile is not a panacea. I can easily imagine a scenario where the team is
      Agile but people are not happy. I have been mostly working with Agile teams
      for several years now, and I have not always been happy. Generally, though,
      it hasn't been Agile that has caused me to be unhappy.

      On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 10:16 AM, marty.nelson <noslenytram@...>wrote:

      >
      >
      > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > Brad Appleton <Brad.Appleton@...> wrote:
      > > * Agile is not a synonym for success/good/happiness, and while "being
      > > agile" is a possible means to being successful/good/happy it should not
      > > be confused with the goal of being successful/good/happy.
      >
      > Really? I always thought it was the people-first approach that gave Agile
      > its "timelessness" beyond practices. As Diana Larson once put it to me:
      > "making it the best job people ever had". And the same for the experience of
      > the customer, Managers, VP, etc.
      >
      > If it's just about how to maximize ROI on people banging on a keyboard,
      > seems like the same promise of ever other software development methodology.
      >
      > If someone comes out with a methodology that seeks to align work effort
      > with the happiness (including professionally) of all involved parties, let
      > me know - I think that will be the one to watch...
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Adam Sroka
      In my experience teams that are successful and are following an Agile methodology seem to be happier than other teams. That is only my impression though, and
      Message 96 of 96 , Sep 20, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        In my experience teams that are successful and are following an Agile
        methodology seem to be happier than other teams. That is only my impression
        though, and seems like it would be nearly impossible to quantify (Although,
        I have seen survey results that support the notion.)

        Agile is not a panacea. I can easily imagine a scenario where the team is
        Agile but people are not happy. I have been mostly working with Agile teams
        for several years now, and I have not always been happy. Generally, though,
        it hasn't been Agile that has caused me to be unhappy.

        On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 10:16 AM, marty.nelson <noslenytram@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > Brad Appleton <Brad.Appleton@...> wrote:
        > > * Agile is not a synonym for success/good/happiness, and while "being
        > > agile" is a possible means to being successful/good/happy it should not
        > > be confused with the goal of being successful/good/happy.
        >
        > Really? I always thought it was the people-first approach that gave Agile
        > its "timelessness" beyond practices. As Diana Larson once put it to me:
        > "making it the best job people ever had". And the same for the experience of
        > the customer, Managers, VP, etc.
        >
        > If it's just about how to maximize ROI on people banging on a keyboard,
        > seems like the same promise of ever other software development methodology.
        >
        > If someone comes out with a methodology that seeks to align work effort
        > with the happiness (including professionally) of all involved parties, let
        > me know - I think that will be the one to watch...
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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