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Re: [XP] Re: Pair programming - when it does (not) make sense

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  • daswartz@prodigy
    Hello Adam, ... And cultural environment. It is very difficult to inculcate pairing in an environment where individual heros are rewarded highly and team
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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      Hello Adam,

      Thursday, July 29, 2010, 9:09:59 PM, you wrote:

      > On Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 6:35 PM, JeffGrigg
      > <jeffreytoddgrigg@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> > One more thing: never, ever tell people that they have to
      >> > pair all the time.
      >>
      >> I've done that. It's worked well for me. (But it does depend on the environment and circumstances.)
      >>

      > If the team wants to pair, I think that is great. For some reason
      > pairing is the one thing that some developers are violently opposed to
      > but can't (or won't) argue rationally against. I find suggesting to
      > someone who doesn't pair that they start is a recipe for resistance
      > (And the passive aggressive kind that is hard to confront.)

      > I have gotten much better mileage from simply introducing WIP limits
      > and suggesting that the team get stuff done so that they can get on to
      > other stuff. This forces them to start thinking about how they can
      > help each other, which means they have to talk, which means that pair
      > programming suddenly becomes a good idea.

      > This is mostly an issue of coaching style. YMMV.

      And cultural environment. It is very difficult to inculcate pairing in
      an environment where individual heros are rewarded highly and team
      players are ignored, or in an environment where asking for help is
      considered an admission of weakness or lower skill.


      --
      Doug Swartz
    • Adam Sroka
      ... True, but if that were the case pairing wouldn t be my first concern (Nor second.)
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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        On Tue, Aug 3, 2010 at 9:05 AM, daswartz@prodigy <daswartz@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Hello Adam,
        >
        > Thursday, July 29, 2010, 9:09:59 PM, you wrote:
        >
        > > On Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 6:35 PM, JeffGrigg
        > > <jeffreytoddgrigg@...> wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > One more thing: never, ever tell people that they have to
        > >> > pair all the time.
        > >>
        > >> I've done that. It's worked well for me. (But it does depend on the environment and circumstances.)
        > >>
        >
        > > If the team wants to pair, I think that is great. For some reason
        > > pairing is the one thing that some developers are violently opposed to
        > > but can't (or won't) argue rationally against. I find suggesting to
        > > someone who doesn't pair that they start is a recipe for resistance
        > > (And the passive aggressive kind that is hard to confront.)
        >
        > > I have gotten much better mileage from simply introducing WIP limits
        > > and suggesting that the team get stuff done so that they can get on to
        > > other stuff. This forces them to start thinking about how they can
        > > help each other, which means they have to talk, which means that pair
        > > programming suddenly becomes a good idea.
        >
        > > This is mostly an issue of coaching style. YMMV.
        >
        > And cultural environment. It is very difficult to inculcate pairing in
        > an environment where individual heros are rewarded highly and team
        > players are ignored, or in an environment where asking for help is
        > considered an admission of weakness or lower skill.
        >

        True, but if that were the case pairing wouldn't be my first concern
        (Nor second.)
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