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Re: [XP] Re: Results are in on organizational culture survey

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  • Laurent Bossavit
    Hi Paul, ... We have over ten years worth of data on how people feel about agile practices. Adding to that is probably still valuable. And (with the notable
    Message 1 of 55 , Jul 8, 2010
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      Hi Paul,
      > There are other useful things we can say though. We can say how
      > people feel about certain practices in varying contexts. We can talk
      > about peoples perceptions. This is no different to the "Communities
      > of Practice" method of learning the article speaks of.
      >

      We have over ten years' worth of data on how people feel about agile
      practices. Adding to that is probably still valuable.

      And (with the notable exception of Alistair Cockburn's work) there is
      little systematic comparative work undertaken, studying how teams in
      different contexts fare with various agile practices, over time.

      There are some basic things you can record about projects as they are
      starting, underway, and at wrap-up time. I'd want to ask people at the
      start of a project what their primary objectives are and which
      practices they intend to apply. Midway through (or more frequently if
      possible), I'd want to know if that plan had changed: if they'd
      adopted practices they hadn't intended to, or dropped practices that
      were in the original plan. Finally I'd find it interesting to record
      outcomes - whether the project had achieved what it set out to, or
      something different (and perhaps considered satisfactory).

      If you collected answers of that sort across many contexts, perhaps
      you'd see patterns emerge.

      This triad intent-practice-outcome strikes me as important. It seems
      to me to capture a fundamental fact of our activity: we do certain
      things because we think doing them will do some good; then things
      sometimes turn out well, and sometimes badly. What helps and what
      hurts? That's a difficult question, because we're often biased in
      interpreting why things turned out as they did (the "narrative
      fallacy"). Carefully keeping tabs on what actually happens across a
      variety of contexts is a way to guard against such mistakes.

      Cheers,
      Laurent Bossavit
      laurent@...
    • Laurent Bossavit
      Hi Paul, ... I m just getting things off the ground at the moment, so I may have more to tell in a few months. The initiative is called Institut Agile and aims
      Message 55 of 55 , Jul 14, 2010
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        Hi Paul,
        > Well done! Keeps us all posted. In fact can you tells us more?
        >
        I'm just getting things off the ground at the moment, so I may have
        more to tell in a few months. The initiative is called Institut Agile
        and aims at two things, growing the agile business ecosystem and
        getting agile on the map as a research topic on an equivalent footing
        to "software engineering". The scope is (for now) local to France. One
        of the first items on the roadmap is to start establishing a database
        of projects for the purposes of those longitudinal studies I mentioned
        in the article I posted earlier. Another is to get in touch with
        everyone I can find doing research on agile practices (typically in
        software engineering departments) and put them in touch with each other.

        Cheers,
        Laurent Bossavit
        laurent@...
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