Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: FW: [XP] Re: Stop crippling agile, back to basics

Expand Messages
  • Charlie Poole
    Hi Ron, Nicely put. It lacks the sarcasm of your earlier post, which is probably good for general circulation - although I quite liked the original myself. One
    Message 1 of 65 , Jul 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Ron,

      Nicely put. It lacks the sarcasm of your earlier post, which is
      probably good for general
      circulation - although I quite liked the original myself.

      One of the earliest projects I worked on in my career - the first
      large one, in fact - was
      a Customer Information System, written in PLI and running under CICS. Because of
      certain policy constraints, most of the folks available to work on it
      were under-skilled.
      In fact, some of them were actually business analysts learning to
      program for the
      first time.

      If we had insisted on the "ideal" project team, we wouldn't have
      gotten anywhere in
      that environment. If we had tried to do the project in the "ideal" way
      - ignoring the
      composition of the team, I'm convinced it would have failed.

      Instead, we set up a way of working that allowed each individual to do what they
      were able to do within a predefined design and application structure.
      Many folks
      simply took stubbed out code - from a code generator I wrote - and filled in the
      blanks. Much time was spent showing the results to users and tailoring it based
      on their comments. Only two of us actually understood how CICS worked and
      why our application was structured as it was.

      The project finished on time and within budget and met all its goals.
      It was used
      for many years until a later group of folks decided to go with a
      database system.
      By the time it was over, many of the folks who started out with low skills were
      ready to go on to other projects and take a more independent role.

      This was the 70s, so it has little to do with agile, but lots to do with the gap
      between ideals and the best thing to do in a given situation.

      Charlie

      On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 7:53 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
      > Hello, Marvin.  On Thursday, June 24, 2010, at 6:38:06 AM, you
      > wrote:
      >
      >> A MANIFESTO OF SECOND BEST ALTERNATIVES
      >
      > I wrote an article directed at this question:
      >
      > Can doing something anti-Agile be more effective?
      >
      >  Let’s consider two “dimensions” of a project, the extent to which
      >  it adheres to “Agile” values, and the extent to which it is an
      >  effective or successful project.
      >
      >  http://xprogramming.com/articles/can-doing-something-anti-agile-be-more-effective/
      >
      > Enjoy ...
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > www.xprogramming.com/blog
      > I don't do force. People should do what they want, and experience
      > the consequences.
      > How are productivity and personal preference balanced?
      > You get to decide.
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to:   extremeprogramming@...
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
      >
      > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... Sure ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com www.xprogramming.com/blog The fact that we know more today, and are more capable today, is good news about
      Message 65 of 65 , Jul 23, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello, Jeff. On Friday, July 23, 2010, at 7:52:49 AM, you wrote:

        >> Yes. I only have one major issue with your cards, which is that I
        >> didn't think of it and do it first. That wouldn't be so bad if you
        >> were screwing them up but unfortunately they're great.

        > Drat. Sorry about that. Many thanks, though.

        > That would be a great inclusion on a card to be included in the deck
        > ("Four out of Five Experts Agree", or something like that), if you're
        > willing to offer up the quote.

        Sure ...

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        www.xprogramming.com/blog
        The fact that we know more today, and are more capable today,
        is good news about today, not bad news about yesterday.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.