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Re: [XP] Seeking XP myths

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Bill. On Wednesday, January 20, 2010, at 2:06:55 PM, you ... The above embodies the unproven assumption that troubles me. It is being assumed that rip
    Message 1 of 147 , Jan 20 12:18 PM
      Hello, Bill. On Wednesday, January 20, 2010, at 2:06:55 PM, you
      wrote:

      > Frankly, I don't know that I could've been successful in that
      > earlier stage, because it would've *required* rip it and ship it
      > to stay ahead of the competition (some who arguably may have had
      > better code quality, but not the features needed to land the key
      > contracts).

      The above embodies the unproven assumption that troubles me.

      It is being assumed that "rip it and ship it" provides barely
      acceptable features faster than approaches that are more like the
      quality-focused ones some of us know and love.

      I don't think that's obvious at all. Most rip it and ship it
      projects that I observe go through long bug-fixing hell periods
      before reluctantly shipping software that they know will displease
      their users.

      It is far from obvious that practices like TDD will take longer to
      get to acceptable. I'm sure that for me, my code works well enough
      much sooner when I TDD, and I am better equipped to know what works
      and what does not, so that I'm better equipped to know whether or
      not to ship.

      I think one can do better by /choosing/ what features one wants, and
      /choosing/ what barely acceptable means, and then working with high
      skill and quality techniques to attain those features, at that level
      of quality.

      Rapid shipment, it seems to me, is going to be easier to attain by
      good story slicing decisions, not by relying on good fortune to keep
      the bugs out of the important bits.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Do only what is necessary. Keep only what you need.
    • Tim Ottinger
      ... That spoke my intention very well. There are formal and informal power structures, and they have their places. They need to be respected.
      Message 147 of 147 , Feb 1, 2010
        > I can't speak for Tim, but the direction I was going is that while a manager
        > really should act more like a scrum master does, she should not be acting in the
        > capacity of a scrum master. There are dynamics about the manager/managed
        > relationship that, even if you mean well, are there. Now the question as to
        > whether there should even be such a person as a manager is a different, and much
        > longer and livelier, discussion.
        >

        That spoke my intention very well.
        There are formal and informal power structures, and they have their places.
        They need to be respected.
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