Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [XP] balancing the pair in pair programming

Expand Messages
  • Curtis Cooley
    I once worked with a team located in Foster City and San Jose. They are close, but bay area traffic can make them seem like across the country. The project
    Message 1 of 45 , Dec 2, 2009
      I once worked with a team located in Foster City and San Jose. They are
      close, but bay area traffic can make them seem like across the country. The
      project manager's solution was to have each team work "at home" 3 days and
      have one team commute once a week. So the team got two days of full team
      collaboration for the cost of one day commuting. The other three days we
      left an open line between the two teams so they could hear what was going on
      and comment. If a team member had a question for the other team, he just
      talked louder into the phone to gain attention. On collaboration days, team
      members were encouraged but not required to "cross pollinate" so to speak.

      On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 8:44 PM, Rob Park <robert.d.park@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > A couple thoughts:
      >
      > * Can you come up with a team space in each location? If so, have team
      > members all meet at 1 location at a time and rotate the location every day
      > or every couple days if needed.
      > * Or treat it as if you were 200 miles apart and pair remotely with VNC and
      > Skype (or some similar alternative).
      >
      > --
      > Rob
      > --
      > http://agileintention.blogspot.com
      > http://twitter.com/robpark
      >
      >
      > On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 10:43 PM, zaidoun alzoabi <zdnfa@...<zdnfa%40yahoo.com>>
      > wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Thanx for your responses,
      > >
      > > I do agree that frequent swap is very important to balance the pairs and
      > to
      > > enhance knowldge sharing amongst all, but what if swapping was not easy.
      > In
      > > most of the projects I have worked for, the team was geographically
      > > separated, at least into two places that are 2 miles away, with poor
      > > Internet connection. How can I have this frequent swap???
      > >
      > > In my experience I found that the expert-junior is the best combination.
      > It
      > > does increase the skill level of both, but what we had to do is that let
      > the
      > > junior be involved more in customer collaboration, where the expert is
      > more
      > > involved in writing the code, the junior one was sitting beside and the
      > > irony is that the junior helped in quality assurance, as he has better
      > > collaboration with the customer.
      > >
      > > regards
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      >
      > >
      > > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...<extremeprogramming%40eGroups.com>
      > >
      > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      > > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...<extremeprogramming-unsubscribe%40eGroups.com>
      > >
      > > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Curtis Cooley
      curtis.cooley@...
      home:http://curtiscooley.com
      blog:http://ponderingobjectorienteddesign.blogspot.com
      ===============
      Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you
      must be without one, be without the strategy.
      -- H. Norman Schwarzkopf


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • thycotic
      ... Some ideas here: http://agileshout.com/questions/15/what-is-the-best-match-for-pair-programming-beginner-expert-beginner-beginner
      Message 45 of 45 , Dec 19, 2009
        > In my experience I found that the expert-junior is the best
        > combination. It does increase the skill level of both, but what we
        > had to do is that let the junior be involved more in customer
        > collaboration, where the expert is more involved in writing the
        > code, the junior one was sitting beside and the irony is that the
        > junior helped in quality assurance, as he has better collaboration
        > with the customer.

        Some ideas here:
        http://agileshout.com/questions/15/what-is-the-best-match-for-pair-programming-beginner-expert-beginner-beginner
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.