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Distributed Teams (was "Cards" (was: summary of the discusion

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  • Sean Corfield
    ... That s a very visceral difference! Thanx for the feedback so far - Laurent s comment about red dots on overdue story cards is very telling and I loved
    Message 1 of 49 , Nov 7, 2009
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      On Sat, Nov 7, 2009 at 12:45 PM, Dave Rooney <dave.rooney@...> wrote:
      > Sean Corfield wrote:
      > > Can some folks talk about why putting the stories into some shared
      > > data store rather on physical cards might not be advisable? What sort
      > > of problems have folks run into using some simple electronic
      > > representation, such as a spreadsheet or some other simple electronic
      > > document / set of documents?
      > The group with cards sat around a table facing each other and discussing
      > the content of the cards. The group using Excel all sat facing the
      > laptop, and quite often the discussion was about what columns should be
      > included, their headings, formatting, etc.

      That's a very visceral difference!

      Thanx for the feedback so far - Laurent's comment about red dots on
      overdue story cards is very telling and I loved Bill's suggested
      experiment. Yes, it's very clear the electronic form of "cards" breaks
      down quickly in that scenario while you're "embracing change"...

      So that leads to my next logical question:

      Just how do you mitigate the lack of face-to-face communication for a
      distributed team?

      I've probably worked on distributed teams about as often as I've
      worked with face-to-face teams (and few of those environments have
      managed to apply XP at all, let alone successfully - but that's
      another story for another time).

      What are the best substitutes people have found for real cards when
      dealing with a distributed team?

      What other issues do distributed teams face with XP and what
      recommendations do you have for overcoming those issues?

      Thanx...
      --
      Sean A Corfield -- (904) 302-SEAN
      Railo Technologies US -- http://getrailo.com/
      An Architect's View -- http://corfield.org/

      "If you're not annoying somebody, you're not really alive."
      -- Margaret Atwood
    • William Pietri
      ... It sounds crazy, but the primary purpose of some software development projects is not actually delivering useful software. Sure, nobody will say otherwise,
      Message 49 of 49 , Nov 11, 2009
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        Tim Ottinger wrote:
        > It really is shocking to me. Most agile shops bring investors, C-level managers, and customers into our work rooms and show off the card walls to them. The idea of hiding that is totally alien to my agile experience.
        >

        It sounds crazy, but the primary purpose of some software development
        projects is not actually delivering useful software. Sure, nobody will
        say otherwise, but when you analyze behaviors, other things may be
        effectively more important. E.g., billing lots of hours. Or improving an
        executive's image. Or continuing to support the illusions that
        salespeople have fed to customers. Or creating opportunities for heroic
        effort.

        Trying to introduce Agile approaches to projects like that is an
        exercise in frustration. Effectiveness, efficiency, and transparency can
        have negative value to some stakeholders.

        William
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