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Re: [XP] Digest Number 9292

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  • transkawa
    Extreme Programmingreally the similarity or analogy was found on wikipedia. only days old on agile. The problem is about having a team. I live in an area where
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 10, 2009
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      Extreme Programmingreally the similarity or analogy was found on wikipedia.
      only days old on agile.
      The problem is about having a team. I live in an area where I might have difficulty; not have, will have difficulty having a team that is why, thinking of SIMPLICITY, I thought a game would leverage the learning process. I'll have to look for a poker game to download; it's for the estimation technique stage of planning.
      Now, are there other uses of extreme programming apart from IT, so I can think of creating a team.
      It's all about: people over process, people over process.
      links will help very much.
      thanks
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 3:20 PM
      Subject: [XP] Digest Number 9292

      Extreme Programming
      Messages In This Digest (3 Messages)
      1a. xtreme programming game From: transkawa
      1b. Re: xtreme programming game From: Ron Jeffries
      1c. Re: xtreme programming game From: Adam Sroka
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      1a. xtreme programming game
      Posted by: "transkawa" transkawa@... transkawa
      Sat Aug 8, 2009 11:43 am (PDT)


      is there a game that exemplifies the tenets of xtreme programming: communication, simplicity, feedback and courage? scrum has one, the rughby game. wish anyone can help me.
      yours
      transkawa


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      Messages in this topic (3)
      1b. Re: xtreme programming game
      Posted by: "Ron Jeffries" ronjeffries@... RonaldEJeffries
      Sat Aug 8, 2009 12:15 pm (PDT)


      Hello, transkawa. On Saturday, August 8, 2009, at 10:19:34 AM,
      you wrote:

      > is there a game that exemplifies the tenets of xtreme
      > programming: communication, simplicity, feedback and courage?
      > scrum has one, the rughby game. wish anyone can help me.

      What does the game of rugby have to do with Scrum?

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Here is Edward Bear, coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back
      of his head. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of coming downstairs,
      but sometimes he feels that there really is another way, if only he could
      stop bumping for a moment and think of it. And then he feels that perhaps
      there isn't. -- A. A. Milne


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      Messages in this topic (3)
      1c. Re: xtreme programming game
      Posted by: "Adam Sroka" adam.sroka@... adamjaph
      Sat Aug 8, 2009 12:31 pm (PDT)


      On Sat, Aug 8, 2009 at 12:14 PM, Ron Jeffries<ronjeffries@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hello, transkawa. On Saturday, August 8, 2009, at 10:19:34 AM,
      >
      > you wrote:
      >
      >> is there a game that exemplifies the tenets of xtreme
      >> programming: communication, simplicity, feedback and courage?
      >> scrum has one, the rughby game. wish anyone can help me.
      >
      > What does the game of rugby have to do with Scrum?
      >

      From wikipedia:

      "In 1986, Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka described a new
      holistic approach that increases speed and flexibility in commercial
      new product development.[2] They compare this new holistic approach,
      in which the phases strongly overlap and the whole process is
      performed by one cross-functional team across the different phases, to
      rugby, where the whole team "tries to go to the distance as a unit,
      passing the ball back and forth". The case studies come from the
      automotive, photo machine, computer and printer industries.

      "In 1991, DeGrace and Stahl, in Wicked Problems, Righteous
      Solutions,[3] referred to this approach as Scrum, a rugby term
      mentioned in the article by Takeuchi and Nonaka. "

      It's just a metaphor, and I question how pertinent it really is.

      To answer the original question: while sports metaphors have certainly
      been used in the XP community, none of them play a central, defining
      role. If there is one that comes close it is probably the driving
      metaphor (See /Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change/ by Kent
      Beck, or various other sources.)


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