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Re: [XP] Re: Great video on Craftmanship and ethics by Robert Martin

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  • Chris Wheeler
    ... This is interesting. Do tests exist in the cloud or are they local? If they exist in the cloud I understand how you could go to a subscription model. If
    Message 1 of 97 , Feb 28, 2009
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      On Sat, Feb 28, 2009 at 2:02 AM, kentb <kentb@...> wrote:

      > John,
      >
      > The price for JUnit Max is starting at $2/month during the beta period. I
      > hope this is less of a barrier than $2500.
      >

      This is interesting. Do tests exist in the cloud or are they local? If they
      exist in the cloud I understand how you could go to a subscription model. If
      hosted locally, and run on a number of workstations, how do you implement
      the subscription model? Is there a connection made between JUnit Max and a
      license server?

      Very curious,

      Chris.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tony_t_tubbs
      ... questions. ... Thanks for the clarification. Honestly, I did not hear this in the talk at all, but am glad to hear this now. With books and forums like
      Message 97 of 97 , Mar 3, 2009
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        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, John Roth <JohnRoth1@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > tony_t_tubbs said:
        >
        > > I enjoy Uncle Bob's writings and lectures, and am coming from this
        > > with the assumption I should listen to him. However, I have
        questions.
        >
        > > He talked about writing a login page, and putting all the code in the
        > > GUI to start, then pulling out the business layer, then from there
        > > pulling out the DB layer. Doing what he called a spike or thin layer
        > > of functionality top-to-bottom. In theory I get it, it makes sense,
        > > but in practice building testable GUIs is hard, that's why we have
        > > patterns like Presenter First or Presentation Model. If you are not
        > > starting with such a pattern that enables testing, how are you writing
        > > tests? How are you mixing whatever those tests are with writing code
        > > all in the 30 sec bits?
        >
        > You aren't. In XP, the term "spike" means a piece of code you write,
        > possibly without tests, to explore something. It's intended to be thrown
        > away, and that's --almost-- what he did by pulling the data base and
        > then the business logic out of the UI code. When he pulled that logic
        > out is when he wrote the tests for the persistance and domain layers.
        >
        > What's left is the very skeletal UI required to run the screen. That's
        > very, very difficult to write tests for, which is why we try to make it
        > as small as possible. All the testing that's needed is a little stuff to
        > make sure the controls are connected. That can use an external test
        > harness; in fact, it can be left for manual testing in a lot of cases.
        >
        > Everything else is in a lower layer, with a full suite of tests.
        >
        > John Roth
        >

        Thanks for the clarification. Honestly, I did not hear this in the
        talk at all, but am glad to hear this now. With books and forums like
        this being my main partners and coaches, some things come off to me as
        really good sounding theory but no way I can see it working in
        practice. (Such as my misunderstanding here) I may be reading more
        into things than is really said, but I just naturally and honestly
        tend to take things very literal. Then I spend half a day reading and
        rereading and Googling trying to figure out how I write everything
        into the UI code behinds and do TDD at the same time. There's not
        enough Mountain Dew to keep me sane!

        Thanks again,
        TT
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