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Re: [XP] Quality-Speed Tradeoff - You're kidding yours elf.

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  • Bill Kelly
    From: Ron Jeffries [...] ... I ran across a remarkable visualization of this the other day: Both images are a complete map of
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 2, 2009
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      From: "Ron Jeffries" <ronjeffries@...>
      [...]
      > In short, much of the complexity of Windows is in the way it was
      > built, not the way it had to be built. The difference is what my
      > article calls "quality".

      I ran across a remarkable visualization of this the other day:

      Both images are a complete map of the _system calls_ that occur
      when a web server serves up a single page of html with a single
      picture. The same page and picture.

      The first picture is of the system calls that occur on a Linux
      server running Apache.

      The second image is of a Windows Server running IIS, Microsoft's
      web server application.

      http://www.stiennon.com/images/SysCallApache.jpg

      http://www.stiennon.com/images/SysCallIIS.jpg


      The original article was here (but the site seems to have shut
      its doors as of yesterday!) (Still in Google cache, though.)

      http://www.thisisby.us/index.php/content/why_windows_is_less_secure_than_linux

      The premise of the article was essentially, "In its long
      evolution, Windows has grown so complicated that it is harder to
      secure. ... The more system calls, the greater potential for
      vulnerability, the more effort needed to create secure
      applications."


      Even if one finds points of disagreement with some of the claims
      in the article, I found the system call graphs themselves to be
      quite striking.

      That spaghetti system call graph on Windows fit perfectly with
      how I've come to _feel_ over the years about how their APIs
      interrelate. Somehow, it looks just like I would have expected
      it to look.


      Regards,

      Bill
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Bill. Fantastic example! Thanks! R ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com www.xprogramming.com/blog A lot of preconceptions can be dismissed when you
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 3, 2009
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        Hello, Bill.

        Fantastic example! Thanks!

        R

        On Monday, February 2, 2009, at 10:43:47 PM, you wrote:

        >> In short, much of the complexity of Windows is in the way it was
        >> built, not the way it had to be built. The difference is what my
        >> article calls "quality".

        > I ran across a remarkable visualization of this the other day:

        > Both images are a complete map of the _system calls_ that occur
        > when a web server serves up a single page of html with a single
        > picture. The same page and picture.

        > The first picture is of the system calls that occur on a Linux
        > server running Apache.

        > The second image is of a Windows Server running IIS, Microsoft's
        > web server application.

        > http://www.stiennon.com/images/SysCallApache.jpg

        > http://www.stiennon.com/images/SysCallIIS.jpg


        > The original article was here (but the site seems to have shut
        > its doors as of yesterday!) (Still in Google cache, though.)

        > http://www.thisisby.us/index.php/content/why_windows_is_less_secure_than_linux

        > The premise of the article was essentially, "In its long
        > evolution, Windows has grown so complicated that it is harder to
        > secure. ... The more system calls, the greater potential for
        > vulnerability, the more effort needed to create secure
        > applications."


        > Even if one finds points of disagreement with some of the claims
        > in the article, I found the system call graphs themselves to be
        > quite striking.

        > That spaghetti system call graph on Windows fit perfectly with
        > how I've come to _feel_ over the years about how their APIs
        > interrelate. Somehow, it looks just like I would have expected
        > it to look.



        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        www.xprogramming.com/blog
        A lot of preconceptions can be dismissed when you actually
        try something out. -- Bruce Eckel
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