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Quality-Speed Tradeoff — You’re kidding yourself.

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  • Ron Jeffries
    http://xprogramming.com/blog/2009/02/01/quality-speed-tradeoff-youre-kidding-yourself/ Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com www.xprogramming.com/blog Fatalism is
    Message 1 of 174 , Feb 1, 2009
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      http://xprogramming.com/blog/2009/02/01/quality-speed-tradeoff-youre-kidding-yourself/

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Fatalism is born of the fear of failure, for we all believe that we carry
      success in our own hands, and we suspect that our hands are weak. -- Conrad
    • Charlie Poole
      Hi Ilja, ... Yes. ... Just that I haven t suggested we not fix it. Only that we not use the stop the line technique. It seems as if you are saying that use
      Message 174 of 174 , Feb 5, 2009
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        Hi Ilja,

        > >> And if we don't fix it, we are basically saying that it's
        > ok to keep
        > >> features in a not-really-done state. We are basically saying "this
        > >> feature wasn't really done, but rather than having you
        > learn what it
        > >> takes to really get it done, I'd like you to work on new features
        > >> instead." Seems to me to be a way to more not-really-done
        > features in
        > >> the future.
        > >
        > > Are you conflating the issue of how we fix it with the level of
        > > importance we ascribe to it?
        >
        > I'm saying that the level of importance we ascribe to fixing
        > the defect *will* have an impact on the leve of importance
        > ascribed to preventing defects in the future.

        Yes.

        > > I'm certainly not
        > > saying it's OK to be not-really-done, just that there is a
        > real-world
        > > difference between being released and not being released.
        >
        > Well, by not fixing a not-really-done feature to really-done,
        > I don't see how that's *not* communicating that
        > not-really-done in fact *is* acceptable. You just accepted a
        > not-really-done feature, after all.
        >
        > Might be missing something, though.

        Just that I haven't suggested we not fix it. Only that we
        not use the "stop the line" technique. It seems as if you
        are saying that use of stop the line equates to "this
        is important" and non-use to "we don't care$."

        I simply see it as /one/ way we have of highlighting the
        importance of certain problems. The filing of a bug is,
        in itself, another way. In most places where I've worked,
        bugs were assigned a business priority - here I'm using
        "bug" to refer to those formally reported, of course.

        Other ways will exist in different organizations. I
        suspect that we're suffering a bit here - as in most
        discussions - from the fact that we all imagine this
        happening in a particular context, which of course
        differs for each of us.

        Charlie


        > Cheers, Ilja
        >
        >
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