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Re: [XP] Can one become "Too agile"?

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Lior. On Tuesday, December 2, 2008, at 5:13:58 AM, you ... Well, not really. An iteration is by definition a period of time in which you fix
    Message 1 of 89 , Dec 2, 2008
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      Hello, Lior. On Tuesday, December 2, 2008, at 5:13:58 AM, you
      wrote:

      > It was hard keeping the scope of an iteration constant until its end, and we
      > were doing 1 week iterations.

      Well, not really. An iteration is by definition a period of time in
      which you fix requirements and then build them.

      So a team that changes requirements inside an iteration ... has
      colored outside the Agile guide lines.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      If there's only one answer, then this must not be a very interesting topic.
    • John Levy
      Lior-- [this is late, but...] There is another word for the type of agility you describe: lability. This is used in chemistry to describe molecules that
      Message 89 of 89 , Jan 23, 2009
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        Lior--

        [this is late, but...]

        There is another word for the type of "agility" you describe:
        lability. This is used in chemistry to describe molecules that easily
        detach and re-form in different combinations. Also in psychology for
        easily-changing moods.

        What you observed sounds like a labile organization that is not
        achieving what the Agile principles are all about: business value
        delivered in spite of changing external conditions. One of the
        metrics I use for agile teams is related to stability of the team
        itself. Perhaps there should be another for stability of the business
        plans as reflected in the release plans and other business objectives.

        Sounds to me as if some of the business managers need a wake up call
        or knock on the head. Yes, they are too labile ("agile").

        --John
        -----
        John Levy, PhD
        415 663-1818
        info@...


        Managing product development for speed and innovation

        http://johnlevyconsulting.com


        On Dec 2, 2008, at 3:31 PM, extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        > 1.2. Re: Can one become "Too agile"?
        > Posted by: "Lior Friedman" lfriedmal@... friedmanlior
        > Date: Tue Dec 2, 2008 2:14 am ((PST))
        >
        > Hi Charlie,
        >
        >
        >
        > Yes if you take Agile to mean delivering value then I guess one can't
        > deliver "too much" value
        >
        > What I meant at the time was agile in the regular sense of the word.
        >
        >
        >
        > What I saw is someone taking the "embrace change" part one step too
        > far.
        >
        > Too far in the sense that release plans and work plans were changing
        > so fast
        > that trying to develop was becoming very hard.
        >
        > It was hard keeping the scope of an iteration constant until its
        > end, and we
        > were doing 1 week iterations.
        >
        > Release themes were changing so fast that we felt we didn't have a
        > change to
        > follow through on some ideas, making real progress hard to achieve.
        >
        >
        >
        > Another manifestation of the same problem become the ever changing
        > structure
        > of the teams, teams were forming and dissolving way too fast for my
        > taste
        > giving everyone the feeling of instability.
        >
        >
        >
        > I know that agile is all about change and I do think a team should be
        > prepared for making changes, but still in my opinion no matter what
        > you do
        > change (in most cases) does not come at zero cost,
        >
        > and if one keeps on changing too fast you end up paying that cost
        > without
        > delivering real value.
        >
        >
        >
        > So coming back to my original question,
        >
        > I guess I was aiming at knowing how can agile practices (and maybe
        > principles) can be taken to the point in which they doing more
        > damage than
        > good.
        >
        >
        >
        > Hope this clears things a little
        >
        > Lior
        >
        >



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