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Re: [XP] Re: Local adaptations (was: New Blog Entry - Agile Circling the Drain?)

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Steven. On Sunday, November 23, 2008, at 11:29:20 AM, you ... Yes. I understand the distinction between what we ve called acceptance testing or
    Message 1 of 155 , Nov 23, 2008
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      Hello, Steven. On Sunday, November 23, 2008, at 11:29:20 AM, you
      wrote:

      > Consider the following way of looking at the distinction between these
      > two types of testing:

      > If the following is true (or made to be true):
      > - all requirements are "testable",
      > - these testable requirements are correctly represented as automated
      > acceptance (verification) tests, and
      > - the automated verification tests work correctly and are run and
      > consulted frequently,
      > then exploratory testing is not part of testing whether the software
      > being developed in the current iteration is "acceptable" or "done",
      > because the requirements are exactly the acceptance tests. The
      > acceptance tests are the contract for the iteration.

      > Instead, exploratory testing becomes a critical part of the search for
      > new or missing requirements to be implemented in future iterations.
      > Those new or missing requirements found by exploratory testing are
      > prioritized and then get represented as new automated verification
      > tests when they are scheduled to be implemented.

      Yes. I understand the distinction between what we've called
      acceptance testing or customer testing for ten years, and
      exploratory testing. And I agree that exploratory testing can be
      very valuable for a team with solid automated tests. (I believe that
      without solid automated tests, improving test automation is more
      important than improving exploratory testing.)

      What I do not value yet is the notion of calling the customer /
      acceptance tests by a new name. I don't see what that might bring
      us.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Ron Jeffries, speaking for Boskone ... Out.
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Steven. On Sunday, November 23, 2008, at 11:29:20 AM, you ... Yes. I understand the distinction between what we ve called acceptance testing or
      Message 155 of 155 , Nov 23, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello, Steven. On Sunday, November 23, 2008, at 11:29:20 AM, you
        wrote:

        > Consider the following way of looking at the distinction between these
        > two types of testing:

        > If the following is true (or made to be true):
        > - all requirements are "testable",
        > - these testable requirements are correctly represented as automated
        > acceptance (verification) tests, and
        > - the automated verification tests work correctly and are run and
        > consulted frequently,
        > then exploratory testing is not part of testing whether the software
        > being developed in the current iteration is "acceptable" or "done",
        > because the requirements are exactly the acceptance tests. The
        > acceptance tests are the contract for the iteration.

        > Instead, exploratory testing becomes a critical part of the search for
        > new or missing requirements to be implemented in future iterations.
        > Those new or missing requirements found by exploratory testing are
        > prioritized and then get represented as new automated verification
        > tests when they are scheduled to be implemented.

        Yes. I understand the distinction between what we've called
        acceptance testing or customer testing for ten years, and
        exploratory testing. And I agree that exploratory testing can be
        very valuable for a team with solid automated tests. (I believe that
        without solid automated tests, improving test automation is more
        important than improving exploratory testing.)

        What I do not value yet is the notion of calling the customer /
        acceptance tests by a new name. I don't see what that might bring
        us.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        www.xprogramming.com/blog
        Ron Jeffries, speaking for Boskone ... Out.
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