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Facilitating Pairdraw, self organise or not...

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  • Henrik Berglund
    Hi, I was thinking of facilitating a pairdraw excercise: http://www.industriallogic.com/games/pairdraw.html For those of you who have used this excercise: When
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 7, 2008
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      Hi,

      I was thinking of facilitating a pairdraw excercise:
      http://www.industriallogic.com/games/pairdraw.html

      For those of you who have used this excercise:
      When pair drawing, should the team be instructed to take turns
      drawing one line at a time, or do you let them self-organise? If so,
      do you usually see the behaviour with taking turns and completing
      each others work emerge naturally? In most pictures in the example
      you can see this behaviour...

      I would prefer the self organise approach, if it manages to get the
      points through in such a short time, but I also also can imagine that
      the uncertanity introduced by having people taking turns gets them
      more focused, attentive and into teamwork.

      So what do you think? What is the most efficient way to set this
      excercise up? What is your experience?

      - Henrik
    • Joshua Kerievsky
      On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 1:03 AM, Henrik Berglund ... Hello Henrik, Yes, I like to let folks self-organize for this simulation. I like for erasers to be present
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 7, 2008
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        On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 1:03 AM, Henrik Berglund
        <berglund.henrik@...>wrote:

        > I was thinking of facilitating a pairdraw excercise:
        > http://www.industriallogic.com/games/pairdraw.html
        >
        > For those of you who have used this excercise:
        > When pair drawing, should the team be instructed to take turns
        > drawing one line at a time, or do you let them self-organise? If so,
        > do you usually see the behaviour with taking turns and completing
        > each others work emerge naturally? In most pictures in the example
        > you can see this behaviour...
        >
        > I would prefer the self organise approach, if it manages to get the
        > points through in such a short time, but I also also can imagine that
        > the uncertanity introduced by having people taking turns gets them
        > more focused, attentive and into teamwork.
        >
        > So what do you think? What is the most efficient way to set this
        > excercise up? What is your experience?


        Hello Henrik,

        Yes, I like to let folks self-organize for this simulation. I like for
        erasers to be present as well (think refactoring).

        My favorite debrief question (learned from Gerald Weinberg) is "What Was
        That Like For You?" Give folks a few minutes to respond.

        Good luck.

        --
        best regards,
        jk

        Industrial Logic, Inc.
        Joshua Kerievsky
        Founder, Extreme Programmer & Coach
        http://industriallogic.com
        866-540-8336 (toll free)
        510-540-8336 (phone)
        Berkeley, California

        Learn Code Smells, Refactoring and TDD at
        http://industriallogic.com/elearning


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dale Emery
        Hi Henrik, So what do you think? What is the most efficient way to set this excercise ... That probably depends on your goals for the exercise, what learning
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 7, 2008
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          Hi Henrik,

          So what do you think? What is the most efficient way to set this excercise
          > up?


          That probably depends on your goals for the exercise, what learning you're
          hoping to create.

          I haven't facilitated pair drawing, but I've done lots of experiential
          exercises, and I do have a strong preference...

          I prefer to give the task and let participants figure out how to accomplish
          it. Regardless of the nature of the task, allowing people to self-organize
          creates a powerful opportunity for them to observe how they go about
          organizing for an unfamiliar task with perhaps unfamiliar people, and to
          observe the effects of their choices.

          And it allows me, as facilitator, to learn something important about their
          current way of organizing. While they are organizing I pay very close
          attention to what they do and say, and how they respond to each other and to
          what is happening around them (e.g. are they noticing what other pairs are
          doing?) which helps me to decide the kinds of learning questions to ask.
          And it can help me to spontaneously design followup exercises (often a
          variation of the original exercise, but with a twist) that allow people to
          apply what they just learned, and at the same time to learn something new.

          Participants' learnings about how they organize are sometimes profound for
          them, and are almost always widely applicable (given how often they have to
          organize themselves spontaneously in the real world).

          So unless I have a very strong reason to get right to the task, I prefer to
          let participants self-organize.

          Dale

          --
          Dale Emery, Consultant
          Inspiring Leadership for Software People
          Web: http://dhemery.com
          Weblog: http://cwd.dhemery.com


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Henrik Berglund
          ... so, ... the ... that ... for ... is What Was ... Thanks for sharing your ideas/experiences Joshua! br Henrik
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 10, 2008
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            --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Joshua Kerievsky"
            <joshua@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 1:03 AM, Henrik Berglund
            > <berglund.henrik@...>wrote:
            >
            > > I was thinking of facilitating a pairdraw excercise:
            > > http://www.industriallogic.com/games/pairdraw.html
            > >
            > > For those of you who have used this excercise:
            > > When pair drawing, should the team be instructed to take turns
            > > drawing one line at a time, or do you let them self-organise? If
            so,
            > > do you usually see the behaviour with taking turns and completing
            > > each others work emerge naturally? In most pictures in the example
            > > you can see this behaviour...
            > >
            > > I would prefer the self organise approach, if it manages to get
            the
            > > points through in such a short time, but I also also can imagine
            that
            > > the uncertanity introduced by having people taking turns gets them
            > > more focused, attentive and into teamwork.
            > >
            > > So what do you think? What is the most efficient way to set this
            > > excercise up? What is your experience?
            >
            >
            > Hello Henrik,
            >
            > Yes, I like to let folks self-organize for this simulation. I like
            for
            > erasers to be present as well (think refactoring).
            >
            > My favorite debrief question (learned from Gerald Weinberg)
            is "What Was
            > That Like For You?" Give folks a few minutes to respond.
            >
            > Good luck.
            >
            > --
            > best regards,
            > jk
            >
            > Industrial Logic, Inc.
            > Joshua Kerievsky
            > Founder, Extreme Programmer & Coach
            > http://industriallogic.com
            > 866-540-8336 (toll free)
            > 510-540-8336 (phone)
            > Berkeley, California
            >
            > Learn Code Smells, Refactoring and TDD at
            > http://industriallogic.com/elearning
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >

            Thanks for sharing your ideas/experiences Joshua!

            br

            Henrik
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