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Re: [XP] Adaptive Methods for reality

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  • Dale Emery
    Hi Marco, —your critical feedback will be much appreciated. I think the scientific methods fits software development better in the long term than in the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 3, 2008
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      Hi Marco,

      �your critical feedback will be much appreciated.


      I think the scientific methods fits software development better in the long
      term than in the short term. I'm glad there are folks like you taking the
      scientific approach. Being less patient than you, I personally have more
      energy for the crucible of the marketplace, which works faster, though at
      the expense of rigor.

      I recommend that you introduce yourself to James Bach, who also takes a
      deeply philosophical approach to the software world, especially to testing
      (and also to learning in general, the subject of his upcoming book).
      James's motto says volumes about his approach: "Epistemology for the rest of
      us." I'm guessing that you could have some rich, rewarding conversations
      with James.

      I also recommend that you improve your writing style. Though I like your
      ideas, I had to work harder to understand your writing than I prefer. I
      think there are a few stylistic changes that would make a big difference for
      you, and help you to reach a wider audience.

      One important style tip: First connect, then inform. Begin sentences (and
      paragraphs, and sections, and articles) with information people already
      know, and put new information at the end. This allows readers to read
      without having to keep so much information in their heads. Your first
      sentence violates that in a way that makes your point hard to understand:

      "The attitude of mind to approach reality that has helped humans to explain
      and to predict phenomena (observed facts) consistently and precisely, the
      scientific mindset, is one among those things computer professionals could
      adopt to better understand software development fundamentals."

      Consider this inversion: "One thing computer professionals could adopt to
      better understand software development fundamentals is the scientific
      mindset, the attitude of mind to approach reality that has helped humans to
      explain and to predict phenomena (observed facts) consistently and
      precisely."

      This inversion starts by connecting with an intention, which immediately
      lets readers know whether this article is relevant for them. If they want
      to understand software development fundamentals, they'll read on. If not,
      not.

      I would probably invert further: "To better understand software development
      fundamentals ..." This moves the connection even further to the front of
      the sentence. This inversion expresses the same concepts in the same words
      as your original, but in an order that connects sooner and more forcefully
      with the reader, and that doesn't require readers to keep so much in their
      heads.

      I highly recommend Joseph M. Willams's book STYLE. Williams describes the
      stylistic choices available to the writer, and how each choice affects
      readers. There are two versions:
      Longer version:
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321479351/dalehemery-20
      Summary version:
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321330854/dalehemery-20

      Also good is Martha Kolln's RHETORICAL GRAMMAR:
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321397231/dalehemery-20

      Finally, what is the source of the Boulding quote? I'm a huge fan of
      Boulding and would love a reason to read something of his that I haven't
      read yet.

      Dale

      --
      Dale Emery, Consultant
      Inspiring Leadership for Software People
      Web: http://dhemery.com
      Weblog: http://cwd.dhemery.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marco Dorantes
      Thank you very much Dale, your feedback has helped me a lot. Kenneth Boulding was quoted by John C. Gordon in this book
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 3, 2008
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        Thank you very much Dale, your feedback has helped me a lot.

        Kenneth Boulding was quoted by John C. Gordon in this book
        <http://www.addall.com/detail/0300120060.html> , which refers to this
        source:

        Science: our common heritage
        Kenneth Boulding
        Science 22 February 1980: 831-836
        DOI: 10.1126/science.6766564

        Best regards.


        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Dale Emery" <dale@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi Marco,
        >
        > —your critical feedback will be much appreciated.
        >
        >
        > I think the scientific methods fits software development better in the
        long
        > term than in the short term. I'm glad there are folks like you taking
        the
        > scientific approach. Being less patient than you, I personally have
        more
        > energy for the crucible of the marketplace, which works faster, though
        at
        > the expense of rigor.
        >
        > I recommend that you introduce yourself to James Bach, who also takes
        a
        > deeply philosophical approach to the software world, especially to
        testing
        > (and also to learning in general, the subject of his upcoming book).
        > James's motto says volumes about his approach: "Epistemology for the
        rest of
        > us." I'm guessing that you could have some rich, rewarding
        conversations
        > with James.
        >
        > I also recommend that you improve your writing style. Though I like
        your
        > ideas, I had to work harder to understand your writing than I prefer.
        I
        > think there are a few stylistic changes that would make a big
        difference for
        > you, and help you to reach a wider audience.
        >
        > One important style tip: First connect, then inform. Begin sentences
        (and
        > paragraphs, and sections, and articles) with information people
        already
        > know, and put new information at the end. This allows readers to read
        > without having to keep so much information in their heads. Your first
        > sentence violates that in a way that makes your point hard to
        understand:
        >
        > "The attitude of mind to approach reality that has helped humans to
        explain
        > and to predict phenomena (observed facts) consistently and precisely,
        the
        > scientific mindset, is one among those things computer professionals
        could
        > adopt to better understand software development fundamentals."
        >
        > Consider this inversion: "One thing computer professionals could adopt
        to
        > better understand software development fundamentals is the scientific
        > mindset, the attitude of mind to approach reality that has helped
        humans to
        > explain and to predict phenomena (observed facts) consistently and
        > precisely."
        >
        > This inversion starts by connecting with an intention, which
        immediately
        > lets readers know whether this article is relevant for them. If they
        want
        > to understand software development fundamentals, they'll read on. If
        not,
        > not.
        >
        > I would probably invert further: "To better understand software
        development
        > fundamentals ..." This moves the connection even further to the front
        of
        > the sentence. This inversion expresses the same concepts in the same
        words
        > as your original, but in an order that connects sooner and more
        forcefully
        > with the reader, and that doesn't require readers to keep so much in
        their
        > heads.
        >
        > I highly recommend Joseph M. Willams's book STYLE. Williams describes
        the
        > stylistic choices available to the writer, and how each choice affects
        > readers. There are two versions:
        > Longer version:
        > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321479351/dalehemery-20
        > Summary version:
        > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321330854/dalehemery-20
        >
        > Also good is Martha Kolln's RHETORICAL GRAMMAR:
        > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321397231/dalehemery-20
        >
        > Finally, what is the source of the Boulding quote? I'm a huge fan of
        > Boulding and would love a reason to read something of his that I
        haven't
        > read yet.
        >
        > Dale
        >
        > --
        > Dale Emery, Consultant
        > Inspiring Leadership for Software People
        > Web: http://dhemery.com
        > Weblog: http://cwd.dhemery.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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