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Re: [XP] Ping-pong pairing - any resources?

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  • Simon Kirk
    Cheers Cenk.
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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      Cheers Cenk.

      On 3 Sep 2008, at 16:26, Cenk Çivici wrote:

      > This is how we use it pretty much...
      >
      > http://www.magpiebrain.com/blog/2007/02/13/pairing-pattern-ping-pong-pairing/
      >
      >
      >
      > On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Dave Smith <davewsmith@...>
      > wrote:
      >> Simon,
      >>
      >> On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
      >>> wrote:
      >>
      >>> Hi all
      >>>
      >>> Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-
      >>> pong
      >>> pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the
      >>> keyboard is
      >>> swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
      >>
      >> I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong
      >> programming is
      >> way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before
      >> talking
      >> about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need
      >> resources
      >> other
      >> than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed
      >> (though
      >> two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary
      >> reasons).
      >>
      >>> Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
      >>> that they can have a look at for reference?
      >>
      >> http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
      >> it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.
      >>
      >> The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
      >> pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
      >> That's been my experience.
      >>
      >> Dave
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Simon Kirk
      Hi Dave ... Yes, I agree. Trying it out is exactly what the group are going to do. I was using Study Group in terms of the pattern from Fearless Change, but
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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        Hi Dave

        On 3 Sep 2008, at 16:20, Dave Smith wrote:

        > Simon,
        >
        > On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
        >> wrote:
        >
        >> Hi all
        >>
        >> Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-
        >> pong
        >> pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard
        >> is
        >> swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
        >
        >
        > I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong
        > programming is
        > way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before
        > talking
        > about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need
        > resources
        > other
        > than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed
        > (though
        > two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary
        > reasons).

        Yes, I agree. Trying it out is exactly what the group are going to do.
        I was using Study Group in terms of the pattern from Fearless Change,
        but really, it's the development team taking a chance to learn
        something together.

        The two keyboards and mouse approach is something they're ready to
        give a go.

        But one of the team wanted to try and find something to read in case
        somebody else had some wisdom...

        >
        >
        >
        >> Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
        >> that they can have a look at for reference?
        >
        >
        > http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
        > it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.
        >
        > The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
        > pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
        > That's been my experience.

        ... which is precisely what you've given me there :)

        Thanks for the link, I'll forward it on.

        Cheers,
        Simon
        [|]
      • Phlip
        ... Sounds like my egg-timer experiment - search in this group over this summer for those threads. The experiment is ongoing... -- Phlip
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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          Simon Kirk wrote:

          > Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong
          > pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is
          > swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
          >
          > Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
          > that they can have a look at for reference?

          Sounds like my egg-timer experiment - search in this group over this summer for
          those threads. The experiment is ongoing...

          --
          Phlip
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