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Ping-pong pairing - any resources?

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  • Simon Kirk
    Hi all Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is swapped,
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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      Hi all

      Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong
      pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is
      swapped, and the other writes the passing code.

      Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
      that they can have a look at for reference?

      Cheers,
      Simon

      [|]
    • Dave Smith
      Simon, On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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        Simon,

        On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
        > wrote:

        > Hi all
        >
        > Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong
        > pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is
        > swapped, and the other writes the passing code.


        I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong programming is
        way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before talking
        about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need resources
        other
        than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed (though
        two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary reasons).


        > Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
        > that they can have a look at for reference?


        http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
        it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.

        The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
        pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
        That's been my experience.

        Dave


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Cenk Çivici
        This is how we use it pretty much... http://www.magpiebrain.com/blog/2007/02/13/pairing-pattern-ping-pong-pairing/
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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          This is how we use it pretty much...

          http://www.magpiebrain.com/blog/2007/02/13/pairing-pattern-ping-pong-pairing/



          On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Dave Smith <davewsmith@...> wrote:
          > Simon,
          >
          > On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
          >> wrote:
          >
          >> Hi all
          >>
          >> Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong
          >> pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is
          >> swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
          >
          > I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong programming is
          > way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before talking
          > about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need resources
          > other
          > than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed (though
          > two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary reasons).
          >
          >> Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
          >> that they can have a look at for reference?
          >
          > http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
          > it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.
          >
          > The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
          > pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
          > That's been my experience.
          >
          > Dave
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
        • Simon Kirk
          Cheers Cenk.
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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            Cheers Cenk.

            On 3 Sep 2008, at 16:26, Cenk Çivici wrote:

            > This is how we use it pretty much...
            >
            > http://www.magpiebrain.com/blog/2007/02/13/pairing-pattern-ping-pong-pairing/
            >
            >
            >
            > On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Dave Smith <davewsmith@...>
            > wrote:
            >> Simon,
            >>
            >> On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
            >>> wrote:
            >>
            >>> Hi all
            >>>
            >>> Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-
            >>> pong
            >>> pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the
            >>> keyboard is
            >>> swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
            >>
            >> I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong
            >> programming is
            >> way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before
            >> talking
            >> about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need
            >> resources
            >> other
            >> than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed
            >> (though
            >> two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary
            >> reasons).
            >>
            >>> Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
            >>> that they can have a look at for reference?
            >>
            >> http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
            >> it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.
            >>
            >> The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
            >> pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
            >> That's been my experience.
            >>
            >> Dave
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Simon Kirk
            Hi Dave ... Yes, I agree. Trying it out is exactly what the group are going to do. I was using Study Group in terms of the pattern from Fearless Change, but
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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              Hi Dave

              On 3 Sep 2008, at 16:20, Dave Smith wrote:

              > Simon,
              >
              > On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 5:50 AM, Simon Kirk <extremeprogramming@...
              >> wrote:
              >
              >> Hi all
              >>
              >> Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-
              >> pong
              >> pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard
              >> is
              >> swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
              >
              >
              > I kind of suspect that a study group approach to ping-pong
              > programming is
              > way overkill, unless the study group is going to try it out before
              > talking
              > about it. Ping pong is really, really simple. It doesn't need
              > resources
              > other
              > than computer with some flavor of unit testing framework installed
              > (though
              > two keyboards/mice can be helpful for logistical and sanitary
              > reasons).

              Yes, I agree. Trying it out is exactly what the group are going to do.
              I was using Study Group in terms of the pattern from Fearless Change,
              but really, it's the development team taking a chance to learn
              something together.

              The two keyboards and mouse approach is something they're ready to
              give a go.

              But one of the team wanted to try and find something to read in case
              somebody else had some wisdom...

              >
              >
              >
              >> Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
              >> that they can have a look at for reference?
              >
              >
              > http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PairProgrammingPingPongPattern describes
              > it quite well on 1/3rd of a page.
              >
              > The theory behind Ping Pong Programming, as far as I've seen, is
              > pretty simple: it keeps both halves of a pair attentive and occupied.
              > That's been my experience.

              ... which is precisely what you've given me there :)

              Thanks for the link, I'll forward it on.

              Cheers,
              Simon
              [|]
            • Phlip
              ... Sounds like my egg-timer experiment - search in this group over this summer for those threads. The experiment is ongoing... -- Phlip
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 3, 2008
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                Simon Kirk wrote:

                > Some of my team are forming a study group around (so-called) ping-pong
                > pairing, meaning one of the pair writes the test, then the keyboard is
                > swapped, and the other writes the passing code.
                >
                > Has anybody got any resources, info or whatever about this practice
                > that they can have a look at for reference?

                Sounds like my egg-timer experiment - search in this group over this summer for
                those threads. The experiment is ongoing...

                --
                Phlip
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