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Re: [XP] Re: Cost estimates are quaint

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  • Steven Gordon
    ... Why couldn t any candidate that one already knows about (whether it is known to be a best-fit, known to not be a best-fit, or neither) be the first-fit for
    Message 1 of 136 , Aug 24, 2008
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      On Sun, Aug 24, 2008 at 8:48 PM, David H. <dmalloc@...> wrote:
      > <snip>
      >
      >>> Briefly, our minds implement first-fit pattern matching (find the
      >>> first solution that seems good enough) not best-fit.
      >
      > Might I ask how you arrived at that statement? This article (amongst
      > many others)
      > http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2430007
      > seems to contradict you. It seems to be very situationally dependent
      > whether the brain returns a first-fit for evaluation or a best-fit it
      > already knows about

      Why couldn't any candidate that one already knows about (whether it is
      known to be a best-fit, known to not be a best-fit, or neither) be the
      first-fit for evaluation? If the first candidate solution one settles
      on trying first just happens to turn out to be a best-fit sometimes,
      how does that negate that hypothesis?

      > This of course takes inot account that best-fit only works for repetitive
      > things
      >
      > Thanks
      >
      > -d
      >
    • Steven Gordon
      ... Why couldn t any candidate that one already knows about (whether it is known to be a best-fit, known to not be a best-fit, or neither) be the first-fit for
      Message 136 of 136 , Aug 24, 2008
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        On Sun, Aug 24, 2008 at 8:48 PM, David H. <dmalloc@...> wrote:
        > <snip>
        >
        >>> Briefly, our minds implement first-fit pattern matching (find the
        >>> first solution that seems good enough) not best-fit.
        >
        > Might I ask how you arrived at that statement? This article (amongst
        > many others)
        > http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2430007
        > seems to contradict you. It seems to be very situationally dependent
        > whether the brain returns a first-fit for evaluation or a best-fit it
        > already knows about

        Why couldn't any candidate that one already knows about (whether it is
        known to be a best-fit, known to not be a best-fit, or neither) be the
        first-fit for evaluation? If the first candidate solution one settles
        on trying first just happens to turn out to be a best-fit sometimes,
        how does that negate that hypothesis?

        > This of course takes inot account that best-fit only works for repetitive
        > things
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > -d
        >
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