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Re: [XP] Dangerous Tools?

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  • Tim Ottinger
    Heh! Pair programming screws this up rather seriously. I checked in code that I wrote with George, Kent, and Robert. Over on Fred s box, I help him for a few
    Message 1 of 56 , Jul 1, 2008
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      Heh! Pair programming screws this up rather seriously.
      I checked in code that I wrote with George, Kent, and Robert.
      Over on Fred's box, I help him for a few hours and he checks in.
      Now, who gets what score?


      Tim Ottinger
      http://tottinge.blogsome.com/
      http://blog.objectmentor.com/


      ----- Original Message ----
      > From: George Dinwiddie <lists@...>
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, July 1, 2008 8:14:14 PM
      > Subject: Re: [XP] Dangerous Tools?
      >
      > Michael Dubakov wrote:
      > > What do you think about tools like http://www.programeter.com ?
      > >
      > > "Programeter is a first management tool able to measure programmers'
      > > know-how as well as constantly monitor their contributions. Fully
      > > automated."
      > >
      > > I may see easily how this tool will work against the team...
      >
      > Looking at the list of indicators measured, I'm not sure whether they're
      > intended to be positive or negative. And it's amazing to me that a tool
      > can measure programmer knowledge by source code analysis.
      >
      > - George
      >
      > --
      > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      > * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      > Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      > Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
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    • Steve Freeman
      Correction. I remember that story, but it wasn t from me. Not sure who it was. The indirect story I did tell was of a CEO of a rival company to Worldcom when
      Message 56 of 56 , Jul 16, 2008
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        Correction. I remember that story, but it wasn't from me. Not sure who
        it was.

        The indirect story I did tell was of a CEO of a rival company to
        Worldcom when Bernie Ebbers was cooking his books. Because this CEO
        was honest his numbers weren't as good and he got thrown out.

        S.

        On 10 Jul 2008, at 23:05, Kent Beck wrote:
        > At QCon London I got a short, sharp lesson on the downside of
        > transparency.
        > Steve Freeman told a story where he and his partner caused the team
        > to miss
        > a delivery date. It was understandable, reasonable, not done with
        > malice or
        > incompetence, just one of those things. However, he had a boss who
        > was in
        > the habit of summarily firing people who brought bad news but wasn't
        > particularly good at ferreting out details. The "transparent" thing
        > for
        > Steve to do would be to own up to his mistake and get fired. I don't
        > think
        > anyone thought that was a good idea, even if we were swept up in the
        > rhetoric of transparency. The lesson I learned is that transparency
        > needs to
        > be balanced with safety. I still think, though, that in most
        > situations
        > transparency is safe, often safer than trying to keep secrets.
        >
        > There's another sense in which transparency is a business fashion at
        > the
        > moment, like casual clothes and sports analogies, and working to
        > lead the
        > fashion is better than having someone impose their version. This
        > cuts across
        > the whole good/not good thing. Transparency is a fact of business
        > life, with
        > upsides and downsides. The principle of opportunity suggests that it
        > will be
        > more valuable if turned into a opportunity for learning and
        > demonstrating
        > trustworthiness.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Kent Beck
        > Three Rivers Institute

        Steve Freeman
        http://www.mockobjects.com

        Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon Pask award 2006
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