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Re: [XP] Re: Paper: Tools and Agility

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... That is a very cool way of putting it. And it matches my experience, also. I ve often seen organizations try to streamline by using automated tools
    Message 1 of 41 , Jun 30, 2008
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      Kent Beck wrote:
      > Choosing tools is an important decision with long-range and large-scale
      > consequences. In my experience, a "big switch" planning tool (one that
      > requires seconds to switch to, enter a task, and switch back) results in a
      > plan that plays a much less important role than a "quick switch" tool like
      > cards. The plan has bigger items and they are updated less frequently.

      That is a very cool way of putting it. And it matches my experience, also.

      I've often seen organizations try to "streamline" by using automated
      tools (both project management and time tracking) that will roll up the
      data for reporting to management without human interaction. This type
      of streamlining seems a false hope, to me. Invariably the input data
      has enough garbage in it that the results are not satisfactory to
      anyone. More effort is spent in trying to get low-level workers to put
      in data that produces the desired output than would be required to do a
      human summary.

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Lasse Koskela
      ... Perhaps because we observe the same behavior in ourselves? I don t reach for the manual when I want to tweak a setting in the set-top box but I do when I m
      Message 41 of 41 , Jul 8, 2008
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        On Tue, Jul 8, 2008 at 7:25 PM, Ken Boucher <yahoo@...> wrote:
        > Why are people trusted to have followed one set of processes properly
        > while at the same time it being assumed they can't follow another set
        > of processes properly?

        Perhaps because we observe the same behavior in ourselves?

        I don't reach for the manual when I want to tweak a setting in the
        set-top box but I do when I'm updating the firmware. The complexity is
        similar, the consequences are not.

        Lasse

        --
        Lasse Koskela
        * Author of "Test Driven" (Manning Publications, 2007) *
        * Reaktor Innovations * http://www.ri.fi/en *
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