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What types of organisations adopt agile approaches to software development?

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  • Ant Grinyer
    Having worked in software development for over 15 years in many organisations using different development methodologies such as waterfall, RUP, SCRUM and XP,
    Message 1 of 10 , May 29, 2008
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      Having worked in software development for over 15 years in many
      organisations using different development methodologies such as
      waterfall, RUP, SCRUM and XP, I'm still not sure if there is a
      specific `type' of organisation that is more likely to adopt
      agile approaches than others?

      I guess it could be argued that those organisations that are more
      innovative or open to change are more likely to adopt agile methods?

      To try and gain more understanding, I've decided to run a short
      survey to determine what factors might or might not influence the
      adoption of agile methods, in the hope to provide some enlightenment. If
      we get enough participation, I then hope to report this back to the
      group to see if there are indeed any trends. To participate, could I
      kindly ask you to fill in the survey using the link below? The survey is
      short and should take around 5-10mins to complete.

      http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com
      <http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com/>

      I believe if we can determine the characteristics of organisations that
      adopt and do not adopt agile methods, we can get a better understanding
      whether certain organisations are more conducive to adopting agile
      methods?

      Your participation is greatly appreciated.

      Thanks,
      Ant Grinyer
      Senior Business Analyst


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David H.
      ... What type of questionnaire have you chosen? Dependnent on that and of course the type of questions, what sample size are you looking at to make this a
      Message 2 of 10 , May 29, 2008
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        >
        > http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com
        > <http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com/>
        >
        What type of questionnaire have you chosen? Dependnent on that and of
        course the type of questions, what sample size are you looking at to
        make this a meaningful exercise?
        How are you choosing your sample set?

        -d
        --
        Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
        Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail accounts.

        "Therefore the considerations of the intelligent always include both
        benefit and harm." - Sun Tzu
      • Gary Brown
        ... From: Ant Grinyer To: Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2008 1:59 PM Subject: [XP] What types of
        Message 3 of 10 , May 29, 2008
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Ant Grinyer" <a.grinyer@...>
          To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2008 1:59 PM
          Subject: [XP] What types of organisations adopt agile approaches to software
          development?


          >
          > Having worked in software development for over 15 years in many
          > organisations using different development methodologies such as
          > waterfall, RUP, SCRUM and XP, I'm still not sure if there is a
          > specific `type' of organisation that is more likely to adopt
          > agile approaches than others?
          >
          > I guess it could be argued that those organisations that are more
          > innovative or open to change are more likely to adopt agile methods?
          >
          > To try and gain more understanding, I've decided to run a short
          > survey to determine what factors might or might not influence the
          > adoption of agile methods, in the hope to provide some enlightenment. If
          > we get enough participation, I then hope to report this back to the
          > group to see if there are indeed any trends. To participate, could I
          > kindly ask you to fill in the survey using the link below? The survey is
          > short and should take around 5-10mins to complete.
          >
          > http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com
          > <http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com/>
          >
          > I believe if we can determine the characteristics of organisations that
          > adopt and do not adopt agile methods, we can get a better understanding
          > whether certain organisations are more conducive to adopting agile
          > methods?
          >
          > Your participation is greatly appreciated.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Ant Grinyer
          > Senior Business Analyst

          Ant,

          One question I would remove:

          Q5. What is the name of your organization?

          One question I don't understand:

          Q11. What is the estimated annual turnover of your organization ... ? The
          answers sound like revenue. When I think of turnover, it is how many
          employees leave and must be replaced.

          GB.
        • Amanda Abelove
          Sounds complicated. Agile and Scrum are about making money for the company, either by helping free up resources to take advantage of new opportunities, or
          Message 4 of 10 , May 30, 2008
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            Sounds complicated. Agile and Scrum are about making money for the company,
            either by helping free up resources to take advantage of new opportunities,
            or reduce overhead spent on useless IT projects. Any company that is
            spending too much money on useless IT projects wants a product that will
            help it not waste money.



            Most companies end up wasting money implementing Agile and Scrum processes.
            As products on the whole, Agile and Scrum have a very high field failure
            rate. If they were children's toys, they'd have been recalled by now.



            So,.. The question isn't who wants to adopt them, but who will spend money
            to adopt them and why do they still believe despite empirical evidence that
            Agile and Scrum are not successful products?



            I suspect that it has to do with who holds the purse strings, education
            levels, and community affiliation.



            In any case, I suspect the statistical data analysis on the survey is skewed
            by the sample population and rate of return.



            _____

            From: Gary Brown [mailto:glbrown@...]
            Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2008 4:41 PM
            To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [XP] What types of organisations adopt agile approaches to
            software development?




            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Ant Grinyer" <a.grinyer@sky. <mailto:a.grinyer%40sky.com> com>
            To: <extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
            yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2008 1:59 PM
            Subject: [XP] What types of organisations adopt agile approaches to software

            development?

            >
            > Having worked in software development for over 15 years in many
            > organisations using different development methodologies such as
            > waterfall, RUP, SCRUM and XP, I'm still not sure if there is a
            > specific `type' of organisation that is more likely to adopt
            > agile approaches than others?
            >
            > I guess it could be argued that those organisations that are more
            > innovative or open to change are more likely to adopt agile methods?
            >
            > To try and gain more understanding, I've decided to run a short
            > survey to determine what factors might or might not influence the
            > adoption of agile methods, in the hope to provide some enlightenment. If
            > we get enough participation, I then hope to report this back to the
            > group to see if there are indeed any trends. To participate, could I
            > kindly ask you to fill in the survey using the link below? The survey is
            > short and should take around 5-10mins to complete.
            >
            > http://ou1211237011 <http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com>
            .agile-adoption.sgizmo.com
            > <http://ou1211237011 <http://ou1211237011.agile-adoption.sgizmo.com/>
            .agile-adoption.sgizmo.com/>
            >
            > I believe if we can determine the characteristics of organisations that
            > adopt and do not adopt agile methods, we can get a better understanding
            > whether certain organisations are more conducive to adopting agile
            > methods?
            >
            > Your participation is greatly appreciated.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Ant Grinyer
            > Senior Business Analyst

            Ant,

            One question I would remove:

            Q5. What is the name of your organization?

            One question I don't understand:

            Q11. What is the estimated annual turnover of your organization ... ? The
            answers sound like revenue. When I think of turnover, it is how many
            employees leave and must be replaced.

            GB.





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Julian Hall
            ... ? The ... In UK accountancy terminology, turnover is equivalent to total gross revenue. I take it the term isn t used in this sense in US accountancy?
            Message 5 of 10 , May 30, 2008
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              --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Gary Brown" <glbrown@...>
              wrote:
              > One question I don't understand:
              >
              > Q11. What is the estimated annual turnover of your organization ...
              ? The
              > answers sound like revenue. When I think of turnover, it is how many
              > employees leave and must be replaced.

              In UK accountancy terminology, "turnover" is equivalent to total gross
              revenue. I take it the term isn't used in this sense in US accountancy?
            • Snikerz standard
              The Agile Manifesto - I • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools • Working software over comprehensive documentation • Customer
              Message 6 of 10 , May 30, 2008
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                The Agile Manifesto - I
                • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
                • Working software over comprehensive documentation
                • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
                • Responding to change over following a plan
                We are uncovering better ways of developing
                software by doing it and helping others do it.
                Through this work we have come to value:
                That is, while there is value in the items on
                the right, we value the items on the left more.



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Marty Nelson
                Amanda - ... company, ... opportunities, ... will ... No, Agile is not primarily a waste-trimmer or cost cutter. It provides positive value by helping to
                Message 7 of 10 , May 30, 2008
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                  Amanda -

                  --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Amanda Abelove"
                  <amanda@...> wrote:
                  > Sounds complicated. Agile and Scrum are about making money for the
                  company,
                  > either by helping free up resources to take advantage of new
                  opportunities,
                  > or reduce overhead spent on useless IT projects. Any company that is
                  > spending too much money on useless IT projects wants a product that
                  will
                  > help it not waste money.

                  No, Agile is not primarily a waste-trimmer or cost cutter. It
                  provides positive value by helping to successfully deliver IT
                  projects that have value to their customers.

                  > Most companies end up wasting money implementing Agile and Scrum
                  processes.
                  > As products on the whole, Agile and Scrum have a very high field
                  failure
                  > rate. If they were children's toys, they'd have been recalled by
                  now.

                  I'm still not buying your product argument. Agile is a "way" to
                  approach/do software development. I don't buy yoga, tai-chi, or
                  zen. All though I may take a class or hire a trainer/teacher, the
                  way itself is free.

                  > So,.. The question isn't who wants to adopt them, but who will
                  spend money
                  > to adopt them and why do they still believe despite empirical
                  evidence that
                  > Agile and Scrum are not successful products?

                  Funny thing is that companies that think they can just buy two pounds
                  of Agile and get x from it probably will fail.

                  Will you please site your "empirical evidence that Agile and Scrum
                  are not successful..."?

                  The problem is in defining what "adopted agile" means.

                  Most of us in this community have observed success first-hand with
                  agile that is not merely anecdotal. Unfortunately we are often left
                  with only the words of Judge Potter Stewart to guide us:

                  "I shall not today attempt further to define Agile, but I know it
                  when I see it..."

                  - Marty
                • Phlip
                  ... The Lean Software Development verbiage models all Agile practices as ways to prevent wastage in a projects value chain . The biggest metric of waste is
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 31, 2008
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                    Marty Nelson wrote:

                    > No, Agile is not primarily a waste-trimmer or cost cutter. It
                    > provides positive value by helping to successfully deliver IT
                    > projects that have value to their customers.

                    The "Lean Software Development" verbiage models all Agile practices as ways to
                    prevent wastage in a projects "value chain".

                    The biggest metric of waste is "features not used in their delivered form". That
                    covers bugs, rework, and excess features nobody needs. Matching all features to
                    business values prevents incredible amounts of waste.
                  • J. B. Rainsberger
                    ... Agile is about returning the focus to streams of realizable business value, whatever that means: additional revenue streams, improved revenue streams,
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 1, 2008
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                      On May 30, 2008, at 02:24 , Amanda Abelove wrote:
                      > Sounds complicated. Agile and Scrum are about making money for the
                      > company,
                      > either by helping free up resources to take advantage of new
                      > opportunities,
                      > or reduce overhead spent on useless IT projects. Any company that is
                      > spending too much money on useless IT projects wants a product that
                      > will
                      > help it not waste money.
                      >
                      Agile is about returning the focus to streams of realizable business
                      value, whatever that means: additional revenue streams, improved
                      revenue streams, earlier realization of revenue, reduced costs,
                      shorter payback periods, and more.
                      > Most companies end up wasting money implementing Agile and Scrum
                      > processes.
                      > As products on the whole, Agile and Scrum have a very high field
                      > failure
                      > rate. If they were children's toys, they'd have been recalled by now.
                      >
                      Compared to what?
                      > So,.. The question isn't who wants to adopt them, but who will spend
                      > money
                      > to adopt them and why do they still believe despite empirical
                      > evidence that
                      > Agile and Scrum are not successful products?
                      >
                      Compared to what?
                      ----
                      J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
                      Your guide to software craftsmanship
                      JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
                      2005 Gordon Pask Award for contributions to Agile Software Practice
                    • J. B. Rainsberger
                      ... I can interpret your question at least two ways, and I d like to know what you meant when you asked it. One interpretation, Is there a specific type of
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 1, 2008
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                        On May 29, 2008, at 13:59 , Ant Grinyer wrote:
                        > Having worked in software development for over 15 years in many
                        > organisations using different development methodologies such as
                        > waterfall, RUP, SCRUM and XP, I'm still not sure if there is a
                        > specific `type' of organisation that is more likely to adopt
                        > agile approaches than others?
                        >
                        I can interpret your question at least two ways, and I'd like to know
                        what you meant when you asked it.

                        One interpretation, "Is there a specific type of organization more
                        likely to attempt to adopt agile approaches?"

                        Another: "Is there a specific type of organization more likely to reap
                        benefit (by their measure) from agile approaches?"

                        I don't want to look for a third interpretation. :)
                        ----
                        J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
                        Your guide to software craftsmanship
                        JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
                        2005 Gordon Pask Award for contributions to Agile Software Practice
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