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[XP] Re: The $2.10 Game

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  • marty.nelson
    ... wrote: I found the fact that it was about money to be very enlightening. I see a lot of parallels between the game and the recent discussion of using some
    Message 1 of 165 , Mar 30, 2008
      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Dale Emery" <dale@...>
      wrote:

      I found the fact that it was about money to be very enlightening. I
      see a lot of parallels between the game and the recent discussion of
      using some type of numbers to "sell" XP.

      People didn't want to play because any such numbers were mere
      gambling, or because they wouldn't be fair. Some wanted to see the
      data first, so they could sure any such numbers served to maximize
      their return and protect their self-interest. To me the lesson would
      be to talk about the greater vision first, and agree on that vision
      (and I'm not sure there is a shared vision yet) - then decide on what
      type of number or stats can best support the vision.

      On the flip side, although only George humored me, when I started
      selling magic bean futures, he was not comfortable committing without
      some more "real" stats about what growing magic beans might cost. I
      think this is what Kent and Chris are saying that the CIO feels
      like. Agile is a bunch of magic beans, and it's not even clear what
      it costs to grow them.

      Just my .02 of analysis, you get what you pay for, or Dale does, or
      something like that :)

      >
      > Hi Marty,
      >
      > >
      > > Have you ever had reponses that tried to make your game more
      constructive?
      > > i.e.:
      > >
      > > Let's buy sugar and lemons with our money and open a lemonaid
      stand.
      > >
      > > I'll pay $2.10, we'll each choose our favorite charity, winner's
      choice
      > > gets the money
      >
      >
      > Most people stay more or less within the rules of the game I've
      described.
      > Some poke at the ambiguities and boundaries of the game. I don't
      think
      > anyone has ever suggested replacing the game with a better one.
      >
      > Until now, that is. Thanks!
      >
      > Dale
      >
      > --
      > Dale Emery, Consultant
      > Inspiring Leadership for Software People
      > Web: http://www.dhemery.com
      > Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • J. B. Rainsberger
      ... I was struck by the more than $1.05, I lose; less than $1.05, you lose; $1.05 and it s boring answer, because it s the only one I saw that implied a goal
      Message 165 of 165 , Apr 25, 2008
        On Mar 28, 2008, at 23:54 , Dale Emery wrote:
        > What specific answers did you take particular notice of? What
        > meaning do
        > you make of those answers? What meaning do you make of your /noticing/
        > those answers?
        >
        I was struck by the "more than $1.05, I lose; less than $1.05, you
        lose; $1.05 and it's boring" answer, because it's the only one I saw
        that implied a goal of mutual satisfaction, whereas I was only
        concerned with my return on investment.

        I'm not sure what it means to have noticed that answer, except that it
        reminds me to think about both sides of a transaction, and not just one.
        ----
        J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
        Your guide to software craftsmanship
        JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
        2005 Gordon Pask Award for contributions to Agile Software Practice
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