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"coaching coaching"

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  • Wilson, Michael
    Top o the mornin to ya. I m about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to me to be) rather drastic proportions. I ve done one on one s, a
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
      Top o'the mornin' to ya.

      I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to me
      to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few hours
      on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.

      But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather
      beyond anything I've attempted

      I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
      principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as far
      as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
      multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
      I'm going to run straight in to.

      Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
      It's just rather undiscovered territory.

      - Mike
      -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
      This message is for the named person's use only. This communication is for
      informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources believed to
      be reliable, but it is not necessarily complete and its accuracy cannot be
      guaranteed. It is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the purchase
      or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of any
      transaction. Moreover, this material should not be construed to contain any
      recommendation regarding, or opinion concerning, any security. It may
      contain confidential, proprietary or legally privileged information. No
      confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost by any mistransmission. If
      you receive this message in error, please immediately delete it and all
      copies of it from your system, destroy any hard copies of it and notify the
      sender. You must not, directly or indirectly, use, disclose, distribute,
      print, or copy any part of this message if you are not the intended
      recipient. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
      sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is
      authorized to state them to be the views of any such entity.

      Securities products and services provided to Canadian investors are offered
      by ITG Canada Corp. (member CIPF and IDA), an affiliate of Investment
      Technology Group, Inc.

      ITG Inc. and/or its affiliates reserves the right to monitor and archive
      all electronic communications through its network.

      ITG Inc. Member NASD, SIPC
      -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gary Brown
      Hi, Mike, ... If you are asking for advice on coaching new coaches, I ve had some opportunities to do that. The first thing that I would do, is to have all of
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
        Hi, Mike,

        Quoting "Wilson, Michael" <michael.wilson@...>:

        > Top o'the mornin' to ya.
        >
        > I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to me
        > to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few hours
        > on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.
        >
        > But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather
        > beyond anything I've attempted
        >
        > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
        > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as far
        > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
        > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
        > I'm going to run straight in to.
        >
        > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
        > It's just rather undiscovered territory.

        If you are asking for advice on coaching new coaches, I've had some
        opportunities to do that. The first thing that I would do, is to have
        all of them read and comprehend the pink book, XP Installed. It may
        take multiple readings for the hard-heads like me. 8^)

        I would hope that these new coaches are actively coaching teams.
        IMHO, that is the only way to learn how to do it. If so, I would hold
        daily pre-start of day and post-end of day planning and review
        meetings, to talk about what is happening and how to improve.
        Plan->Do->Check->Act.

        For you, coach by walking around. Make sure everyone has your cell
        phone on speed dial for emergencies.

        GB.
      • Wilson, Michael
        GB, I m actually the new coach, trying to coach myself in ye olde artes of coaching most subtyl and arcayne. Pink book: Check. (Now if only I could get it
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
          GB,

          I'm actually the new coach, trying to coach myself in "ye olde artes of
          coaching most subtyl and arcayne."

          Pink book: Check. (Now if only I could get it on my Kindle.)

          My concern is really that it's such a jump from "Oh here I can pair with
          you and we'll work it out" to "Ok folks, today we're going to be..."
          with a green laser pointer, donuts, hand-outs and *gasp* powerpoint.

          > Make sure everyone has your cell phone on speed dial for emergencies.

          Not enough money in the world.

          - M


          -----Original Message-----
          From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary Brown
          Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2008 12:37 PM
          To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"

          Hi, Mike,

          Quoting "Wilson, Michael" <michael.wilson@...>:

          > Top o'the mornin' to ya.
          >
          > I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to
          > me to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few
          > hours on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.
          >
          > But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather

          > beyond anything I've attempted
          >
          > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
          > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as
          > far as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
          > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
          > I'm going to run straight in to.
          >
          > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
          > It's just rather undiscovered territory.

          If you are asking for advice on coaching new coaches, I've had some
          opportunities to do that. The first thing that I would do, is to have
          all of them read and comprehend the pink book, XP Installed. It may
          take multiple readings for the hard-heads like me. 8^)

          I would hope that these new coaches are actively coaching teams.
          IMHO, that is the only way to learn how to do it. If so, I would hold
          daily pre-start of day and post-end of day planning and review
          meetings, to talk about what is happening and how to improve.
          Plan->Do->Check->Act.

          For you, coach by walking around. Make sure everyone has your cell
          phone on speed dial for emergencies.

          GB.




          ------------------------------------

          To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...

          To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
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          This message is for the named person's use only. This communication is for
          informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources believed to
          be reliable, but it is not necessarily complete and its accuracy cannot be
          guaranteed. It is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the purchase
          or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of any
          transaction. Moreover, this material should not be construed to contain any
          recommendation regarding, or opinion concerning, any security. It may
          contain confidential, proprietary or legally privileged information. No
          confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost by any mistransmission. If
          you receive this message in error, please immediately delete it and all
          copies of it from your system, destroy any hard copies of it and notify the
          sender. You must not, directly or indirectly, use, disclose, distribute,
          print, or copy any part of this message if you are not the intended
          recipient. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
          sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is
          authorized to state them to be the views of any such entity.

          Securities products and services provided to Canadian investors are offered
          by ITG Canada Corp. (member CIPF and IDA), an affiliate of Investment
          Technology Group, Inc.

          ITG Inc. and/or its affiliates reserves the right to monitor and archive
          all electronic communications through its network.

          ITG Inc. Member NASD, SIPC
          -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
        • Kent Beck
          Mike, Beginnings are an exciting and sometimes scary time. It sounds like you have prepared yourself carefully and now you get your chance. The most effective
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
            Mike,

            Beginnings are an exciting and sometimes scary time. It sounds like you have
            prepared yourself carefully and now you get your chance.

            The most effective approach I've found is to first listen and understand. If
            there is no common understanding of the challenges, running an open space
            can help surface the issues. If there is common understanding of the issues
            but no agreement on approach, a format like World Cafe can help the group
            align themselves on what needs to happen. Finally, Appreciative Inquiry can
            help pull ideas out of the the team's collective experience[1]. You can't
            control what you all will decide, but you can encourage and challenge. (My
            partner Cynthia has been trained in all of these and participated in using
            them on a large scale.)

            Best wishes with your overwhelming opportunity,

            Kent Beck
            Three Rivers Institute

            [1] http://www.threeriversinstitute.org/AppreciatingYourWayToXP.htm
            _____

            From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wilson, Michael
            Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2008 7:36 AM
            To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [XP] "coaching coaching"



            Top o'the mornin' to ya.

            I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to me
            to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few hours
            on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.

            But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather
            beyond anything I've attempted

            I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
            principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as far
            as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
            multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
            I'm going to run straight in to.

            Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
            It's just rather undiscovered territory.

            - Mike
            -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
            This message is for the named person's use only. This communication is for
            informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources believed to
            be reliable, but it is not necessarily complete and its accuracy cannot be
            guaranteed. It is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the purchase
            or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of any
            transaction. Moreover, this material should not be construed to contain any
            recommendation regarding, or opinion concerning, any security. It may
            contain confidential, proprietary or legally privileged information. No
            confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost by any mistransmission. If
            you receive this message in error, please immediately delete it and all
            copies of it from your system, destroy any hard copies of it and notify the
            sender. You must not, directly or indirectly, use, disclose, distribute,
            print, or copy any part of this message if you are not the intended
            recipient. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
            sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is
            authorized to state them to be the views of any such entity.

            Securities products and services provided to Canadian investors are offered
            by ITG Canada Corp. (member CIPF and IDA), an affiliate of Investment
            Technology Group, Inc.

            ITG Inc. and/or its affiliates reserves the right to monitor and archive
            all electronic communications through its network.

            ITG Inc. Member NASD, SIPC
            -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Steve Freeman
            Are you anywhere near a regular community meeting? If not, start one. You ll need people to talk to. S. ... Steve Freeman Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
              Are you anywhere near a regular community meeting? If not, start one.
              You'll need people to talk to.

              S.

              On 25 Mar 2008, at 17:28, Wilson, Michael wrote:
              > GB,
              >
              > I'm actually the new coach, trying to coach myself in "ye olde artes
              > of
              > coaching most subtyl and arcayne."
              >
              > Pink book: Check. (Now if only I could get it on my Kindle.)
              >
              > My concern is really that it's such a jump from "Oh here I can pair
              > with
              > you and we'll work it out" to "Ok folks, today we're going to be..."
              > with a green laser pointer, donuts, hand-outs and *gasp* powerpoint.

              Steve Freeman
              Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon Pask award 2006

              http://www.m3p.co.uk

              M3P Limited.
              Registered office. 2 Church Street, Burnham, Bucks, SL1 7HZ.
              Company registered in England & Wales. Number 03689627
            • Keith Ray
              consider getting coaching / related training... http://www.estherderby.com/workshops/secrets.htm Secrets of Agile Teamwork Beyond technical skills, Agile
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 25, 2008
                consider getting coaching / related training...

                http://www.estherderby.com/workshops/secrets.htm

                "Secrets of Agile Teamwork
                Beyond technical skills, Agile success depends on productive
                self-organizing teams. How do you develop, grow, and maintain a
                functioning self-organizing team? It's not magic, but it doesn't just
                happen either. Effective self-organizing teams rely on personal and
                interpersonal effectiveness. In this hands-on workshop, we'll discover
                the secrets to developing the skills you need to succeed and lead on a
                self-organizing team. "

                http://www.industriallogic.com/training/index.html

                http://www.industriallogic.com/xp/assessment.html



                On Tue, Mar 25, 2008 at 10:28 AM, Wilson, Michael
                <michael.wilson@...> wrote:
                >
                > GB,
                >
                > I'm actually the new coach, trying to coach myself in "ye olde artes of
                > coaching most subtyl and arcayne."
                >
                > Pink book: Check. (Now if only I could get it on my Kindle.)
                >
                > My concern is really that it's such a jump from "Oh here I can pair with
                > you and we'll work it out" to "Ok folks, today we're going to be..."
                > with a green laser pointer, donuts, hand-outs and *gasp* powerpoint.
                >
                >
                > > Make sure everyone has your cell phone on speed dial for emergencies.
                >
                > Not enough money in the world.
                >
                > - M
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary Brown
                > Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2008 12:37 PM
                > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"
                >
                > Hi, Mike,
                >
                > Quoting "Wilson, Michael" <michael.wilson@...>:
                >
                > > Top o'the mornin' to ya.
                > >
                > > I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to
                > > me to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few
                > > hours on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.
                > >
                > > But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather
                >
                > > beyond anything I've attempted
                > >
                > > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                > > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as
                > > far as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                > > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
                > > I'm going to run straight in to.
                > >
                > > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
                > > It's just rather undiscovered territory.
                >
                > If you are asking for advice on coaching new coaches, I've had some
                > opportunities to do that. The first thing that I would do, is to have
                > all of them read and comprehend the pink book, XP Installed. It may
                > take multiple readings for the hard-heads like me. 8^)
                >
                > I would hope that these new coaches are actively coaching teams.
                > IMHO, that is the only way to learn how to do it. If so, I would hold
                > daily pre-start of day and post-end of day planning and review
                > meetings, to talk about what is happening and how to improve.
                > Plan->Do->Check->Act.
                >
                > For you, coach by walking around. Make sure everyone has your cell
                > phone on speed dial for emergencies.
                >
                > GB.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
                >
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
                >
                > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > This message is for the named person's use only. This communication is for
                > informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources believed to
                > be reliable, but it is not necessarily complete and its accuracy cannot be
                > guaranteed. It is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the purchase
                > or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of any
                > transaction. Moreover, this material should not be construed to contain any
                > recommendation regarding, or opinion concerning, any security. It may
                > contain confidential, proprietary or legally privileged information. No
                > confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost by any mistransmission. If
                > you receive this message in error, please immediately delete it and all
                > copies of it from your system, destroy any hard copies of it and notify the
                > sender. You must not, directly or indirectly, use, disclose, distribute,
                > print, or copy any part of this message if you are not the intended
                > recipient. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
                > sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is
                > authorized to state them to be the views of any such entity.
                >
                > Securities products and services provided to Canadian investors are offered
                > by ITG Canada Corp. (member CIPF and IDA), an affiliate of Investment
                > Technology Group, Inc.
                >
                > ITG Inc. and/or its affiliates reserves the right to monitor and archive
                > all electronic communications through its network.
                >
                > ITG Inc. Member NASD, SIPC
                > -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
                >
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
                >
                > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >



                --
                C. Keith Ray, IXP Coach, Industrial Logic, Inc.
                http://industriallogic.com 866-540-8336 (toll free)
                Groove with our Agile Greatest Hits: http://www.industriallogic.com/elearning/
                http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/blog/index.html
              • Christopher K. Joiner, Jr.
                Michael, I have been appointed the XP Coach on my Development Team and have been for about two years now. The XP Series books are all great, I have probably
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 26, 2008
                  Michael,

                  I have been appointed the XP Coach on my Development Team and have been for
                  about two years now. "The XP Series" books are all great, I have probably
                  read each one about 12 times. And it is amazing how much you take out of
                  them each time.

                  The one thing to remember about Coaching is realizing what it isn't. It
                  isn't called XP Judge, XP King, XP Dictator, etc. (I know because I have
                  been called all these and worse.) It isn't about telling the team that this
                  is the way to do things, but rather showing each of the tools that XP can
                  provide to solve a particular problem that needs to be addressed. As each
                  problem presents itself, that is a perfect opportunity to flex the coaching
                  muscle and show a "new" tool that can solve the problem quicker and
                  easier. This basically allows the team to make the decisions of using the
                  practices and principles of XP because they see a need. They will be more
                  likely to embrace the changes and adapt quicker.

                  I am a firm believer in using tools as they are intended to be used. One of
                  the ideals behind XP is "People over Process". I can not stress this enough.
                  Only put process in place when absolutely necessary.

                  As an XP Coach, your job is to find ways that your team can work faster and
                  more efficiently by using the tools that XP can provide in the correct way.
                  XP is supposed to be simple. Put the round peg in the round hole, the square
                  peg in the square hole, and if there is not a triangular hole, then put the
                  triangle down because there is no where to put it yet.

                  Hopefully this helps, and if there are any parts that need clarification, or
                  any more questions, or any problems that you are facing, I can try to help
                  the best way that I can.

                  --

                  "XP is not simply adhering to strict guidelines, but rather using the
                  practices and principles of XP strictly *as* guidelines to adapt them to you
                  and your team to produce quality code quickly"

                  .Chris.
                  Christopher K. Joiner, Jr.
                  Senior Agile Software Developer
                  XP Coach
                  PrimeTel Communications, Inc.




                  On Tue, Mar 25, 2008 at 7:41 PM, Keith Ray <keith.ray@...> wrote:

                  > consider getting coaching / related training...
                  >
                  > http://www.estherderby.com/workshops/secrets.htm
                  >
                  > "Secrets of Agile Teamwork
                  > Beyond technical skills, Agile success depends on productive
                  > self-organizing teams. How do you develop, grow, and maintain a
                  > functioning self-organizing team? It's not magic, but it doesn't just
                  > happen either. Effective self-organizing teams rely on personal and
                  > interpersonal effectiveness. In this hands-on workshop, we'll discover
                  > the secrets to developing the skills you need to succeed and lead on a
                  > self-organizing team. "
                  >
                  > http://www.industriallogic.com/training/index.html
                  >
                  > http://www.industriallogic.com/xp/assessment.html
                  >
                  >
                  > On Tue, Mar 25, 2008 at 10:28 AM, Wilson, Michael
                  > <michael.wilson@... <michael.wilson%40itg.com>> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > GB,
                  > >
                  > > I'm actually the new coach, trying to coach myself in "ye olde artes of
                  > > coaching most subtyl and arcayne."
                  > >
                  > > Pink book: Check. (Now if only I could get it on my Kindle.)
                  > >
                  > > My concern is really that it's such a jump from "Oh here I can pair with
                  > > you and we'll work it out" to "Ok folks, today we're going to be..."
                  > > with a green laser pointer, donuts, hand-outs and *gasp* powerpoint.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > > Make sure everyone has your cell phone on speed dial for emergencies.
                  > >
                  > > Not enough money in the world.
                  > >
                  > > - M
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > -----Original Message-----
                  > > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>]
                  > On Behalf Of Gary Brown
                  > > Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2008 12:37 PM
                  > > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com<extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"
                  > >
                  > > Hi, Mike,
                  > >
                  > > Quoting "Wilson, Michael" <michael.wilson@...<michael.wilson%40itg.com>
                  > >:
                  > >
                  > > > Top o'the mornin' to ya.
                  > > >
                  > > > I'm about to embark on an internal coaching project of (what seem to
                  > > > me to be) rather drastic proportions. I've done one on one's, a few
                  > > > hours on TDD as related to C++ (yeah, THAT was fun :-p) etc.
                  > > >
                  > > > But this is different. It's extended training and as such it's rather
                  > >
                  > > > beyond anything I've attempted
                  > > >
                  > > > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                  > > > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as
                  > > > far as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                  > > > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
                  > > > I'm going to run straight in to.
                  > > >
                  > > > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
                  > > > It's just rather undiscovered territory.
                  > >
                  > > If you are asking for advice on coaching new coaches, I've had some
                  > > opportunities to do that. The first thing that I would do, is to have
                  > > all of them read and comprehend the pink book, XP Installed. It may
                  > > take multiple readings for the hard-heads like me. 8^)
                  > >
                  > > I would hope that these new coaches are actively coaching teams.
                  > > IMHO, that is the only way to learn how to do it. If so, I would hold
                  > > daily pre-start of day and post-end of day planning and review
                  > > meetings, to talk about what is happening and how to improve.
                  > > Plan->Do->Check->Act.
                  > >
                  > > For you, coach by walking around. Make sure everyone has your cell
                  > > phone on speed dial for emergencies.
                  > >
                  > > GB.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------
                  > >
                  > > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...<extremeprogramming%40eGroups.com>
                  > >
                  > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                  > > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...<extremeprogramming-unsubscribe%40eGroups.com>
                  > >
                  > > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.comYahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > This message is for the named person's use only. This communication is
                  > for
                  > > informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources believed
                  > to
                  > > be reliable, but it is not necessarily complete and its accuracy cannot
                  > be
                  > > guaranteed. It is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the
                  > purchase
                  > > or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of
                  > any
                  > > transaction. Moreover, this material should not be construed to contain
                  > any
                  > > recommendation regarding, or opinion concerning, any security. It may
                  > > contain confidential, proprietary or legally privileged information. No
                  > > confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost by any mistransmission.
                  > If
                  > > you receive this message in error, please immediately delete it and all
                  > > copies of it from your system, destroy any hard copies of it and notify
                  > the
                  > > sender. You must not, directly or indirectly, use, disclose, distribute,
                  > > print, or copy any part of this message if you are not the intended
                  > > recipient. Any views expressed in this message are those of the
                  > individual
                  > > sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is
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                  > --
                  > C. Keith Ray, IXP Coach, Industrial Logic, Inc.
                  > http://industriallogic.com 866-540-8336 (toll free)
                  > Groove with our Agile Greatest Hits:
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                  > http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/blog/index.html
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                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Keith Ray
                  *The Art of Agile Development*, by Shane Warden and James Shore is also a very good. Pay attention to how often if refers you to a mentor to help with
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 26, 2008
                    *The Art of Agile Development*, by Shane Warden and James Shore is also a
                    very good. Pay attention to how often if refers you to a mentor to help with
                    situations that a book can't cover in detail.

                    On Wed, Mar 26, 2008 at 5:46 AM, Christopher K. Joiner, Jr. <
                    ckjoinerjr@...> wrote:

                    > Michael,
                    >
                    > I have been appointed the XP Coach on my Development Team and have been
                    > for
                    > about two years now. "The XP Series" books are all great, I have probably
                    > read each one about 12 times. And it is amazing how much you take out of
                    > them each time.
                    > [...]

                    --
                    C. Keith Ray, IXP Coach, Industrial Logic, Inc.
                    http://industriallogic.com 866-540-8336 (toll free)
                    Groove with our Agile Greatest Hits:
                    http://www.industriallogic.com/elearning/
                    http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/blog/index.html


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Cory Foy
                    Hi Mike, ... Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my last position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 2, 2008
                      Hi Mike,

                      Wilson, Michael wrote:
                      > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                      > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as far
                      > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                      > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
                      > I'm going to run straight in to.
                      >
                      > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
                      > It's just rather undiscovered territory.

                      Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my last
                      position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                      multi-day. Our workshop on Advanced .NET Debugging ripped the CLR apart
                      and even touched on assembly concepts - and was 4 intensive days for the
                      students. It was brutal.

                      The key to a successful class has several elements:

                      1) You have to feel comfortable with the material. Not be an expert.
                      But be willing to look up things, discuss things, and follow through on
                      your research. You need to be the confident one, but also humble.

                      2) The course should have definitive goals and check points. People
                      should reach passes throughout the class where they can see that they've
                      learned something and gotten to the next level.

                      3) People need to be dedicated to the class. If they are in and out
                      all day, then it is disruptive for everyone involved.

                      A book I'd highly recommend (outside of the ones already given) is _Even
                      a Geek can Speak_.

                      Finally, I found the most successful classes I delivered were those
                      where the students had an action plan in mind and ready to go. They were
                      mapping the concepts we were discussing into their domains and
                      real-world situations. That's something that can really make a class shine.

                      And, of course, let us know how it goes!


                      --
                      Cory Foy
                      http://www.cornetdesign.com
                    • Victor
                      One more thing to what has been said here. There is a common tendency for novice teachers/trainers to over prepare. Remember, the purpose of classes is that
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 3, 2008
                        One more thing to what has been said here.

                        There is a common tendency for novice teachers/trainers to over prepare. Remember, the purpose of classes is that students learn, not for the teachers to show off how well they know the material. This should be reflected in the class plan. If the students are overwhelmed, they will not learn well. Good communication (which also means being a good listener) is of the essence. Minimize assumptions as to what they know by keeping a good dialog going. Arrogance and put downs are no-nos.

                        I hope I didn't overwhelm anybody here. :-)

                        Victor

                        =======================================================

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Cory Foy
                        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 10:42 PM
                        Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"


                        Hi Mike,

                        Wilson, Michael wrote:
                        > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                        > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be as far
                        > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                        > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
                        > I'm going to run straight in to.
                        >
                        > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
                        > It's just rather undiscovered territory.

                        Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my last
                        position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                        multi-day. Our workshop on Advanced .NET Debugging ripped the CLR apart
                        and even touched on assembly concepts - and was 4 intensive days for the
                        students. It was brutal.

                        The key to a successful class has several elements:

                        1) You have to feel comfortable with the material. Not be an expert.
                        But be willing to look up things, discuss things, and follow through on
                        your research. You need to be the confident one, but also humble.

                        2) The course should have definitive goals and check points. People
                        should reach passes throughout the class where they can see that they've
                        learned something and gotten to the next level.

                        3) People need to be dedicated to the class. If they are in and out
                        all day, then it is disruptive for everyone involved.

                        A book I'd highly recommend (outside of the ones already given) is _Even
                        a Geek can Speak_.

                        Finally, I found the most successful classes I delivered were those
                        where the students had an action plan in mind and ready to go. They were
                        mapping the concepts we were discussing into their domains and
                        real-world situations. That's something that can really make a class shine.

                        And, of course, let us know how it goes!

                        --
                        Cory Foy
                        http://www.cornetdesign.com




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Mike Hill
                        Mike, Victor, Cory... For Industrial Logic, I teach about a third of my work time, a figure that s held true for about the last ten years or so. (The second
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 3, 2008
                          Mike, Victor, Cory...

                          For Industrial Logic, I teach about a third of my work time, a figure
                          that's held true for about the last ten years or so. (The second third is
                          spent coaching, and the last spent developing course material for our online
                          and in-person courses.)

                          The advice being offered is great, and I'd like to add these elements:

                          1. Don't teach what you don't care about. Communicating passion is often
                          far more valuable than mere technical knowledge. Your students are
                          grownups, *internet-capable* grownups, and they're perfectly capable of
                          finding out more on any topic that they wish to pursue. At least half of
                          your job is in sparking that wish.

                          2. In teaching, the first step forward comes when you are able to stand in
                          front of a room full of people and say "I don't know..." There are several
                          variant endings, perhaps the best of which is "...let's find out." But the
                          first three words are still key. Instead of thinking of yourself as the
                          professor, think of yourself as the 'lead student'. The trust you garner
                          will more than make up for any perceived weakness deriving from a frank
                          admission.

                          3. Watch your pupils closely. Look for the glaze, the lightbulb, the
                          glare, the nod, the nodding off. All of these are ways to assess how
                          effective your current take on a topic is. There are dozens of effective
                          ways to communicate your ideas, and no one of them is right for every
                          student, so be prepared to experiment, even radically, with your material.
                          (When I teach for IL, I try one completely new experiment each week. Some
                          flop, some soar.)

                          It will help if you marry a master teacher, as I did. Failing that, at
                          least befriend one. I would never have become a successful teacher without
                          my many many daily debriefs with Virginia, my wife. She has convinced me
                          over and over again of the importance of the above principles. She has also
                          been an absolute fountain of weird and sometimes wildly successful ideas for
                          engaging my classes.

                          Cheers, and good luck, and above all, have fun!
                          Hill

                          <mike@...>
                          Check out our advanced eLearning on microtesting: <
                          http://industriallogic.com/elearning>


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • jay_conne
                          Hi Mike, I have spent a large fraction of my four decades in this industry successfully developing, delivering and managing such training. Cory s advice below
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 3, 2008
                            Hi Mike,

                            I have spent a large fraction of my four decades in this industry
                            successfully developing, delivering and managing such training.

                            Cory's advice below is great. To do this well require a thoughtful
                            plan and practices - call me if you need some coaching in doing it.

                            Here's a quick primmer...

                            Start with knowing your goal for the class: Upon completing this
                            training the students will be able to... (starting with verbs) - with
                            as much detail as you think appropriate.

                            Then develop a hierarchy of knowledge to get you there. This should
                            include presentations of ideas, exercises to concertize those ideas
                            and discussions to establish understanding and reinforce the ideas in
                            the group or team.

                            Remember - you are using valuable time - multiply an hourly rate by
                            the number of people involved. Invest enough effort to make it worth
                            the company's investment of that amount of salary and potential lost
                            opportunity.

                            Start the class with why people should care...

                            "People are not interested in answers to a questions they don't have!"

                            For example, I start my Lean/Agile/Scrum/XP Intro. classes or Project
                            Team Start-up classes with evidence of how our historical approaches
                            have failed, and get people to a clear YES on the history of
                            self-deception we have endured. We acknowledge how painful that has
                            been for all parties and then proceed to discuss a more same
                            alternative. I use the line:

                            "Humans deserve better!".

                            To get past normal defensiveness in getting people to change long
                            established habits, I think it is critical to make it humorous and
                            fun. Get people laughing about how foolish *we* have been - and how
                            painful it has been for all parties in the game as I said above.

                            Here are some details -

                            1. Milestones are critical for keeping the
                            instructor/leader/facilitator on track as well as the
                            students/participants. An agenda slide that repeats at transitions
                            allows you and the class to track where they are on the path - in a
                            Tufte style of visual presentation. I even color code the slide items
                            to indicate what's done, what's next, and what's left.

                            2. Think through the hierarchy of learning that the material
                            requires. Get the dependencies nailed down. Understand how lecture,
                            discussion and exercises reinforce the learning sequence. (This is a
                            principle missed in much education of our children today based on
                            incompetent ideas coming from John Dewey's theory of education -
                            misnamed 'progressive'.)

                            3. Using PowerPoint, I use the notes feature with this outline:
                            Purpose, Points not to miss (Points:), Optional points (Opt:), and
                            Transition. I do this to manage the attention of both the leader and
                            the students to my training intention. In effect, I develop each
                            course as a train the trainer tool. It serves me well if I'm only
                            doing it for myself.

                            Purpose: (What should the presenter have in mind as the goal for
                            this piece of the presentation. Knowing your goal clearly at each
                            step is critical to presenting naturally.

                            Points: (What are the points not to miss - just key words as
                            prompts to what you have to have already well thought out. This also
                            keeps one from the common mistake of spilling your guts on everything
                            you know on one slide. It's all about intentional focus.)

                            Opt: (Notes on issues that may arise or filler for when you get no
                            interaction that your timing is dependent upon.)

                            Transition: (What do you want to say about the next slide before
                            you distract the audience with reading the new one. Remember it's
                            about managing the attention of your audience and yourself.)

                            4. Exercises - get them off their butts and get them mentally
                            active beyond the conversation in other activities. Know what
                            principle the exercise dramatizes. Perhaps tell them before or let it
                            be discovered. Change up the approach. Once you have their trust,
                            they will play along in your game. A good exercise produces ah-ha's
                            with fun. At the end of the class, I like to review a list of
                            exercises and the principles they concertize. My expectation is that
                            they will be able to remember these in the future to validate why the
                            principle is valuable.

                            5. Remember that all knowledge is contextual - know the context
                            for each principle and practice you recommend. Know the boundary
                            conditions. For example, the ides in the Agile Manifesto apply in our
                            'discovery' context, but not in mass production discipline. Not
                            understanding that distinction, in my opinion, is the heart of why we
                            needed Agile.

                            You can contact me off-list to discuss these ideas. I don't monitor
                            this list as much as I wish I could as you can see from my delay in
                            posting to your message.

                            Jay Conne
                            ==============================
                            Lean/Agile Coach, Trainer and
                            ScrumMaster-Practicing
                            jay@... www.jconne.com
                            617-776-0339 M:617-470-5038
                            ==============================

                            --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Cory Foy <usergroup@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Mike,
                            >
                            > Wilson, Michael wrote:
                            > > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                            > > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be
                            as far
                            > > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                            > > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas" that
                            > > I'm going to run straight in to.
                            > >
                            > > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking for.
                            > > It's just rather undiscovered territory.
                            >
                            > Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my last
                            > position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                            > multi-day. Our workshop on Advanced .NET Debugging ripped the CLR apart
                            > and even touched on assembly concepts - and was 4 intensive days for
                            the
                            > students. It was brutal.
                            >
                            > The key to a successful class has several elements:
                            >
                            > 1) You have to feel comfortable with the material. Not be an expert.
                            > But be willing to look up things, discuss things, and follow through on
                            > your research. You need to be the confident one, but also humble.
                            >
                            > 2) The course should have definitive goals and check points. People
                            > should reach passes throughout the class where they can see that
                            they've
                            > learned something and gotten to the next level.
                            >
                            > 3) People need to be dedicated to the class. If they are in and out
                            > all day, then it is disruptive for everyone involved.
                            >
                            > A book I'd highly recommend (outside of the ones already given) is
                            _Even
                            > a Geek can Speak_.
                            >
                            > Finally, I found the most successful classes I delivered were those
                            > where the students had an action plan in mind and ready to go. They
                            were
                            > mapping the concepts we were discussing into their domains and
                            > real-world situations. That's something that can really make a class
                            shine.
                            >
                            > And, of course, let us know how it goes!
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > Cory Foy
                            > http://www.cornetdesign.com
                            >
                          • jay_conne
                            lol - this certainly contrast with my posting. I agree with your points Victor. The trick is knowing what is appropriate preparing, out of respect for people s
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 3, 2008
                              lol - this certainly contrast with my posting.

                              I agree with your points Victor.

                              The trick is knowing what is appropriate preparing, out of respect for
                              people's time, and what is over preparing :-).

                              Like - "Postpone decisions until the last responsible moment."
                              There's a lot of art in discovering that point.

                              Jay

                              --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Victor" <vmgoldberg@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > One more thing to what has been said here.
                              >
                              > There is a common tendency for novice teachers/trainers to over
                              prepare. Remember, the purpose of classes is that students learn, not
                              for the teachers to show off how well they know the material. This
                              should be reflected in the class plan. If the students are
                              overwhelmed, they will not learn well. Good communication (which also
                              means being a good listener) is of the essence. Minimize assumptions
                              as to what they know by keeping a good dialog going. Arrogance and
                              put downs are no-nos.
                              >
                              > I hope I didn't overwhelm anybody here. :-)
                              >
                              > Victor
                              >
                              > =======================================================
                              >
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: Cory Foy
                              > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 10:42 PM
                              > Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi Mike,
                              >
                              > Wilson, Michael wrote:
                              > > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                              > > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be
                              as far
                              > > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                              > > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas"
                              that
                              > > I'm going to run straight in to.
                              > >
                              > > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking
                              for.
                              > > It's just rather undiscovered territory.
                              >
                              > Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my last
                              > position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                              > multi-day. Our workshop on Advanced .NET Debugging ripped the CLR
                              apart
                              > and even touched on assembly concepts - and was 4 intensive days
                              for the
                              > students. It was brutal.
                              >
                              > The key to a successful class has several elements:
                              >
                              > 1) You have to feel comfortable with the material. Not be an expert.
                              > But be willing to look up things, discuss things, and follow
                              through on
                              > your research. You need to be the confident one, but also humble.
                              >
                              > 2) The course should have definitive goals and check points. People
                              > should reach passes throughout the class where they can see that
                              they've
                              > learned something and gotten to the next level.
                              >
                              > 3) People need to be dedicated to the class. If they are in and out
                              > all day, then it is disruptive for everyone involved.
                              >
                              > A book I'd highly recommend (outside of the ones already given) is
                              _Even
                              > a Geek can Speak_.
                              >
                              > Finally, I found the most successful classes I delivered were those
                              > where the students had an action plan in mind and ready to go.
                              They were
                              > mapping the concepts we were discussing into their domains and
                              > real-world situations. That's something that can really make a
                              class shine.
                              >
                              > And, of course, let us know how it goes!
                              >
                              > --
                              > Cory Foy
                              > http://www.cornetdesign.com
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Wilson, Michael
                              Thanks very much for all this everyone. There s an awful lot of really great information for me to wade through, I really appreciate it. I m going to spend
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 3, 2008
                                Thanks very much for all this everyone. There's an awful lot of really
                                great information for me to wade through, I really appreciate it.

                                I'm going to spend some time chunking through all of this and see if I
                                can't cobble together an interesting digest.

                                - Mike

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                                [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jay_conne
                                Sent: Thursday, April 03, 2008 10:33 AM
                                To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"

                                lol - this certainly contrast with my posting.

                                I agree with your points Victor.

                                The trick is knowing what is appropriate preparing, out of respect for
                                people's time, and what is over preparing :-).

                                Like - "Postpone decisions until the last responsible moment."
                                There's a lot of art in discovering that point.

                                Jay

                                --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Victor" <vmgoldberg@...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > One more thing to what has been said here.
                                >
                                > There is a common tendency for novice teachers/trainers to over
                                prepare. Remember, the purpose of classes is that students learn, not
                                for the teachers to show off how well they know the material. This
                                should be reflected in the class plan. If the students are overwhelmed,
                                they will not learn well. Good communication (which also means being a
                                good listener) is of the essence. Minimize assumptions as to what they
                                know by keeping a good dialog going. Arrogance and put downs are
                                no-nos.
                                >
                                > I hope I didn't overwhelm anybody here. :-)
                                >
                                > Victor
                                >
                                > =======================================================
                                >
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: Cory Foy
                                > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 10:42 PM
                                > Subject: Re: [XP] "coaching coaching"
                                >
                                >
                                > Hi Mike,
                                >
                                > Wilson, Michael wrote:
                                > > I'm steeped in the practices of XP and their derivation from Agile
                                > > principles, so I think I'll be as covered as I can reasonably be
                                as far
                                > > as raw material goes. But the dynamics of multi-day (much less
                                > > multi-week) training has got to have a number of basic "gotchas"
                                that
                                > > I'm going to run straight in to.
                                > >
                                > > Any advice on this? I confess I'm not quite sure what I'm asking
                                for.
                                > > It's just rather undiscovered territory.
                                >
                                > Multi-Day / Multi-Week training can be a bit overwhelming. In my
                                last
                                > position, I had to teach some extremely low-level courses that were
                                > multi-day. Our workshop on Advanced .NET Debugging ripped the CLR
                                apart
                                > and even touched on assembly concepts - and was 4 intensive days
                                for the
                                > students. It was brutal.
                                >
                                > The key to a successful class has several elements:
                                >
                                > 1) You have to feel comfortable with the material. Not be an expert.

                                > But be willing to look up things, discuss things, and follow
                                through on
                                > your research. You need to be the confident one, but also humble.
                                >
                                > 2) The course should have definitive goals and check points. People
                                > should reach passes throughout the class where they can see that
                                they've
                                > learned something and gotten to the next level.
                                >
                                > 3) People need to be dedicated to the class. If they are in and out
                                > all day, then it is disruptive for everyone involved.
                                >
                                > A book I'd highly recommend (outside of the ones already given) is
                                _Even
                                > a Geek can Speak_.
                                >
                                > Finally, I found the most successful classes I delivered were those
                                > where the students had an action plan in mind and ready to go.
                                They were
                                > mapping the concepts we were discussing into their domains and
                                > real-world situations. That's something that can really make a
                                class shine.
                                >
                                > And, of course, let us know how it goes!
                                >
                                > --
                                > Cory Foy
                                > http://www.cornetdesign.com
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >



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