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Re: [XP] Re: Kate Oneal on Productivity

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  • Richard
    In article , ... You could draw a weighted bar chart with the bar size being the product of the size of the duplication and
    Message 1 of 192 , Mar 2 3:11 PM
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      In article <1842169925.20080302164512@...>,
      Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> writes:

      > > Duplicate block of 54 lines in
      > > line 84 in Foo.cs
      > > line 125 in Bar.cs
      >
      > What kind of graphical information might be derived from those
      > reports?

      You could draw a weighted bar chart with the bar size being the
      product of the size of the duplication and the number of times the
      duplication is repeated. This would make the most onerous
      duplications stick out like a sore thumb.

      For an "alarm" style report, you could issue the report when the
      duplication goes up, not down.
      --
      "The Direct3D Graphics Pipeline" -- DirectX 9 draft available for download
      <http://www.xmission.com/~legalize/book/download/index.html>

      Legalize Adulthood! <http://blogs.xmission.com/legalize/>
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... I freely grant that having someone come in and point to issues in the code is helpful. But I ve never seen a team where none of them knew they were
      Message 192 of 192 , Mar 10 6:36 AM
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        Hello, Steven. On Friday, March 7, 2008, at 8:23:05 PM, you wrote:

        >> Why do you say this? Every team I've ever had anything to do with
        >> knew when it was producing crap.

        > Ron,

        > Before you had associated with them, or only after you had
        > enlightened them?

        I freely grant that having someone come in and point to issues in
        the code is helpful. But I've never seen a team where none of them
        knew they were producing junk. Of course, I only see teams who are
        at least somewhat aware that they need help.

        > I have encountered quite a few teams this century who were quite
        > openly proud of their cleverly engineered proprietary DAO, not
        > understanding that they had in reality wasted several person-months
        > creating something inferior to freely available frameworks like
        > Hibernate and whose maintenance was going to degrade their velocity
        > until they finally gave up their pride and replaced it with
        > (N)Hibernate (or the equivalent).

        > Seriously, you have not encountered this phenomenon?

        You describe a phenomenon illustrating my point, where a team
        realizes that their home-grown DAO is holding them back. Yes. It's
        an example of teams figuring out that they are producing / have
        produced crap.

        And my guess is that some of them knew long before, and quite
        possibly even said so. If a team is any good at all, at least some
        of them know.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        If you don't have the courage to say what you think,
        there isn't much use in thinking it, is there?
        --Thomas Jay Peckish II
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