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[XP] Re: refactoring

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  • aacockburn
    ... image ... and ... nature. ... that ... smidgen ... it ... values, the ... but ... it ... Yep, exactly ... except when Eric does it, he tortures his
    Message 1 of 324 , Mar 1, 2008
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      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Kim Gräsman"
      <kim.grasman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Alistair,
      >
      > On Thu, Feb 28, 2008 at 8:35 AM, aacockburn <acockburn@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > First, while you were refactoring, you were refactoring to your
      image
      > > of the original system's nature, structure and purpose. What you
      > > didn't notice was that over time, the system changed it's nature
      and
      > > really became a system different in purpose, structure and
      nature.
      > > Then one day you came in and 'noticed' that the system was a
      > > different system, and suddenly are faced with a huge refactoring.
      > >
      > > Second, looking at Rene Thom's folded over rubber sheet, we see
      that
      > > each new feature request or bug fix shifted the system over a
      smidgen
      > > bit on the rubber sheet. It was all continuous, and then one day
      it
      > > is a bi-valued curve - at one instant, the system has two
      values, the
      > > old nature, and the new nature. It's ambiguous at that instant,
      but
      > > as feature requests keep coming in, it becomes less ambiguous --
      it
      > > becomes more and more the new system.
      >
      > I think Eric Evans has described this in the software modelling
      > context as a "Breakthrough". I'm somehow expecting you have, but if
      > you haven't read his book "Domain-Driven Design" [1], you might like
      > it.
      >
      > - Kim
      >
      > [1] http://www.amazon.com/dp/0321125215/
      >

      Yep, exactly ... except when Eric does it, he tortures his audience
      to /see/ the alternative before it is broken --> that is
      a "breakthrough".


      whereas what I'm talking about is that the system drifts over time as
      new requests come in, until it is no longer the same system it was at
      the start, so you couldn't likely have seen it coming ... that is no
      longer a breakthrough, it's a catastrophe :)

      Aside: I sort of watched from the sidelines for years as he wrote
      that book ... and it's a really great book, except it's longer than
      43 pages long, and it's a documented fact that I only read the first
      43 pages of any software book :) (I read non-software books sometimes
      cover to cover, usually from the back cover to the front cover)
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, arioch022000. On Sunday, April 6, 2008, at 4:08:38 PM, you ... Yes. I think it s unfortunate that so many person-years have been wasted touting brand A
      Message 324 of 324 , Apr 6, 2008
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        Hello, arioch022000. On Sunday, April 6, 2008, at 4:08:38 PM, you
        wrote:

        > Regardless, I think the folk at scrum half far more in common with
        > the folk who advocate XP, especially when compared to what I see
        > going on in many IT shops today.

        Yes. I think it's unfortunate that so many person-years have been
        wasted touting brand A over brand B. Might have made a difference.
        Maybe.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Show me the features!
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