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Re: [XP] Re: Kate Oneal on Productivity

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  • Dale Emery
    Hi Ilja, Probably the most important thing to do is finding out why they don t care ... Purpose and appreciation are big motivators for me. Also check on the
    Message 1 of 192 , Feb 29, 2008
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      Hi Ilja,

      Probably the most important thing to do is finding out why they don't care
      > to do a higher quality job. Perhaps they don't feel that someone outside the
      > team cares? Do they feel that what they are doing has a purpose? Do they
      > feel that someone would appreciate it if they did higher quality work?


      Purpose and appreciation are big motivators for me.

      Also check on the other side of the balance sheet: Forces that work
      /against/ the behaviors and outcomes you want. Check for competing
      concerns. What important concerns do they have that (in their minds)
      conflict with quality? If you can address their concern, or show a way that
      it doesn't conflict with quality after all, that reduces one barrier to
      quality.

      This is especially useful if they have agreed to do various things (related
      to quality) and they are not doing them. Each violation of an agreement is
      a sign of one or more competing commitments -- they are committed to
      /something/ (consciously or not) that in their mind conflicts with the
      agreement they've made.

      Dale

      --
      Dale Emery, Consultant
      Inspiring Leadership for Software People
      Web: http://www.dhemery.com
      Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... I freely grant that having someone come in and point to issues in the code is helpful. But I ve never seen a team where none of them knew they were
      Message 192 of 192 , Mar 10, 2008
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        Hello, Steven. On Friday, March 7, 2008, at 8:23:05 PM, you wrote:

        >> Why do you say this? Every team I've ever had anything to do with
        >> knew when it was producing crap.

        > Ron,

        > Before you had associated with them, or only after you had
        > enlightened them?

        I freely grant that having someone come in and point to issues in
        the code is helpful. But I've never seen a team where none of them
        knew they were producing junk. Of course, I only see teams who are
        at least somewhat aware that they need help.

        > I have encountered quite a few teams this century who were quite
        > openly proud of their cleverly engineered proprietary DAO, not
        > understanding that they had in reality wasted several person-months
        > creating something inferior to freely available frameworks like
        > Hibernate and whose maintenance was going to degrade their velocity
        > until they finally gave up their pride and replaced it with
        > (N)Hibernate (or the equivalent).

        > Seriously, you have not encountered this phenomenon?

        You describe a phenomenon illustrating my point, where a team
        realizes that their home-grown DAO is holding them back. Yes. It's
        an example of teams figuring out that they are producing / have
        produced crap.

        And my guess is that some of them knew long before, and quite
        possibly even said so. If a team is any good at all, at least some
        of them know.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        If you don't have the courage to say what you think,
        there isn't much use in thinking it, is there?
        --Thomas Jay Peckish II
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