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Interruptions metric (was Re: [XP] Re: Sizing Agile projects)

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  • Laurent Bossavit
    ... What do you count as an interruption ? And... what have you seen that tends to be the root cause of interruptions ? Laurent Bossavit laurent@bossavit.com
    Message 1 of 583 , Feb 21, 2008
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      >> Weinberg's Diagram of Effects, taking as a starting point
      >> obvious things like "number of defects" or "number of
      >> unused features".
      >
      > I like to start with "number of interruptions in the day".
      >
      > Few people count them, the impact is enormous.

      What do you count as an interruption ?

      And... what have you seen that tends to be the root cause of
      interruptions ?

      Laurent Bossavit
      laurent@...
    • John A. De Goes
      Hi Dale, ... Agreed. It s comparatively easy to find a source of waste and reduce it. Logically, if you didn t introduce any other form of waste whilst making
      Message 583 of 583 , Mar 6, 2008
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        Hi Dale,

        On Feb 28, 2008, at 6:00 PM, Dale Emery wrote:
        > Yeah. There's an idea tickling my brain, and slowly connecting lots of
        > other loose threads: A really good way to think about productivity
        > is not
        > to think about productivity per se, but instead about cost. In your
        > example, you've eliminated a cost, and allowed people to infer an
        > increase
        > in productivity.
        >

        Agreed. It's comparatively easy to find a source of waste and reduce
        it. Logically, if you didn't introduce any other form of waste whilst
        making this change, then you must have increased productivity, metric
        or no.

        > Here's a half-baked idea: To some extent, each new request from an
        > existing
        > customer expresses satisfaction with our prior performance. (That
        > is, how
        > likely are they to recommend you to themselves?)
        >

        Hmm, I'm not so sure about this. There's a certain cost associated
        with transitioning to a new provider. There's the cost of locating
        that provider, the cost of negotiations, the cost of transferring
        assets to the new provider, the cost of allocating time in the busy
        schedule of the new provider, and the ramp-up costs of the new
        provider becoming acquainted with the existing assets. All of which,
        combined, exceed by many orders of magnitude the cost of a new request
        -- even if the cost of said request is far higher than it should be,
        and its implementation leaves much to be desired.

        If a customer starts new projects with you, however, then that does
        say something about how satisfied they are with your performance.

        Regards,

        John A. De Goes
        N-BRAIN, Inc.
        http://www.n-brain.net
        [n minds are better than n-1]
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