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Re: [XP] Don't let them see our velocity?

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  • Daniel Brolund
    Hi everybody, ... I would guess that Measure up would be the lean way to attack this problem, especially when metrics used on a lower level are more easily
    Message 1 of 342 , Jan 2, 2008
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      Hi everybody,

      J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
      > On Dec 31, 2007, at 16:03 , Peter Bell wrote:
      >
      >
      >> On 12/31/07 2:50 PM, "Ron Jeffries" <ronjeffries@...>
      >> wrote:
      >>
      >>> I do think that if (a) we set our stories to about the same size,
      >>> and (b) we noticed how fast we got them done, there would be
      >>> some valuable information in there about something we could call
      >>> "rate of production" if not "productivity".
      >>>
      >> I see two real world issues with this. I’d love to have some kind of
      >> tool to
      >> tell me something about the productivity (or whatever word you want
      >> to use)
      >> for a team.
      >>
      >
      > There is: profit/loss. If a given company "can't" use profit/loss to
      > determine the effectiveness of a team, then /that/ is a bigger, more
      > urgent problem to solve, in general.
      >
      I would guess that "Measure up" would be the lean way to attack this
      problem, especially when metrics used on a lower level are more easily
      "gameable". A better metric could be something like:

      Performance=Value of Running Tested Features / Aggregated project
      (product) cost

      Of course, a manager could inflate the values, report time on other
      accounts, etc, but that would be self-deception rather than gaming, and
      I think that's out of scope here...

      My view on velocity (as in "story points per iteration") is that it is
      basically how much subjectively perceived complexity the team can cope
      with per time unit. It is how fast you can go in your team-specific
      complexity coordinate system, and it can be used within that coordinate
      system to make predictions about the future, and to retrospect the
      internal productivity development.

      To compare different teams (and different coordinate systems) you need
      to add information by either :
      1) Transforming story point estimation to
      a) a universal coordinate system (function points? :-P), or...
      b) a teams-shared coordinate system (by letting the teams estimate
      their stories together)
      2) Adding value and cost dimensions to each team-specific coordinate system

      1) would enable you improve the teams (or to point fingers if that is
      what you do best). 2) would allow you to improve the organization, to
      optimize the whole.

      Cheers
      Daniel



      Cheers
      Daniel


      > ----
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      Daniel Brolund

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    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you ... Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on how to improve
      Message 342 of 342 , Feb 16, 2008
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        Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you
        wrote:

        > I expect this to increase our velocity in the middle run. And I'm all
        > for measuring it.

        > I doubt we would have even tried this event if we had focused on
        > improving velocity.

        > How does that sound to you?

        Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on
        how to improve velocity. In a discussion on that, I would hope that
        ideas like learning, better tools, higher morale, and better
        communication would come up.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Anyone can make the simple complicated.
        Creativity is making the complicated simple. -- Charles Mingus
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